Facilitation Strategies Used by Job Coaches in Supported Employment Settings: A Preliminary Investigation

Yoshi Ohtake, Janis G. Chadsey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coworker perceptions of facilitation strategies provided by job coaches, and needed by coworkers, and discrepancies between facilitation strategies provided by job coaches and those perceived as being needed by coworkers were analyzed in relation to the types and frequency of problems reported to be exhibited by supported employees (N = 83). The results of this preliminary investigation indicated that when the frequency of work problems was low, the majority of the problems resulted in the need for and provision of less intensive facilitation strategies. Coworkers perceived they needed either low or a mixed level of support, not a high level of support, even when the frequency of work problems was high, except when the problems were related to challenging behaviors such as self-injury and property destruction. The most intriguing finding was that job coaches generally used the level of facilitation strategies that matched coworker needs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)214-227
Number of pages14
JournalResearch and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities
Volume28
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2003

Keywords

  • Coworker perception
  • Facilitation strategy
  • Natural support
  • Supported employment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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