Exquisite Light Sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster Cryptochrome

Pooja Vinayak, Jamie Coupar, S. Emile Hughes, Preeya Fozdar, Jack Kilby, Emma Garren, Taishi Yoshii, Jay Hirsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drosophila melanogaster shows exquisite light sensitivity for modulation of circadian functions in vivo, yet the activities of the Drosophila circadian photopigment cryptochrome (CRY) have only been observed at high light levels. We studied intensity/duration parameters for light pulse induced circadian phase shifts under dim light conditions in vivo. Flies show far greater light sensitivity than previously appreciated, and show a surprising sensitivity increase with pulse duration, implying a process of photic integration active up to at least 6 hours. The CRY target timeless (TIM) shows dim light dependent degradation in circadian pacemaker neurons that parallels phase shift amplitude, indicating that integration occurs at this step, with the strongest effect in a single identified pacemaker neuron. Our findings indicate that CRY compensates for limited light sensitivity in vivo by photon integration over extraordinarily long times, and point to select circadian pacemaker neurons as having important roles.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1003615
JournalPLoS Genetics
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

Fingerprint

Cryptochromes
Photophobia
Drosophila melanogaster
Light
Neurons
neurons
Photons
Diptera
Drosophila
duration
cryptochromes
degradation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Vinayak, P., Coupar, J., Hughes, S. E., Fozdar, P., Kilby, J., Garren, E., ... Hirsh, J. (2013). Exquisite Light Sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster Cryptochrome. PLoS Genetics, 9(7), [e1003615]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003615

Exquisite Light Sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster Cryptochrome. / Vinayak, Pooja; Coupar, Jamie; Hughes, S. Emile; Fozdar, Preeya; Kilby, Jack; Garren, Emma; Yoshii, Taishi; Hirsh, Jay.

In: PLoS Genetics, Vol. 9, No. 7, e1003615, 07.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vinayak, P, Coupar, J, Hughes, SE, Fozdar, P, Kilby, J, Garren, E, Yoshii, T & Hirsh, J 2013, 'Exquisite Light Sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster Cryptochrome', PLoS Genetics, vol. 9, no. 7, e1003615. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003615
Vinayak P, Coupar J, Hughes SE, Fozdar P, Kilby J, Garren E et al. Exquisite Light Sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster Cryptochrome. PLoS Genetics. 2013 Jul;9(7). e1003615. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003615
Vinayak, Pooja ; Coupar, Jamie ; Hughes, S. Emile ; Fozdar, Preeya ; Kilby, Jack ; Garren, Emma ; Yoshii, Taishi ; Hirsh, Jay. / Exquisite Light Sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster Cryptochrome. In: PLoS Genetics. 2013 ; Vol. 9, No. 7.
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