Evidence of aerosolised floating blood mist during oral surgery

K. Ishihama, H. Koizumi, T. Wada, Seiji Iida, S. Tanaka, T. Yamanishi, A. Enomoto, M. Kogo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dental surgery performed with high speed instruments, such as a dental turbine, air motor, or micro-engine handpiece, produces a large amount of splattering and particles, which can be contaminated by micro-organisms from the oral cavity. It has been speculated that such particulate mists contain blood-based elements. In the present study, we investigated whether blood-contaminated aerosol was present in a room where oral surgery was performed with high speed instruments. An extra-oral evacuator system was used for sample collection (N = 132). For the experiment, a non-woven towel was set on the nozzle of the evacuator as a filter and invisible mist was collected at distances of 20, 60 and 100 cm from the surgical site. A leucomalachite green presumptive test was performed with each filter after every tooth extraction. At locations 20 and 100 cm from the surgical site, 76% and 57%, respectively, of the particulates were positive in blood presumptive tests. Based on our results, we consider that blood-contaminated materials have the potential to be suspended in air as blood-contaminated aerosol. These results indicate the risk of cross-infection at the dental practice for immunocompromised patients as well as healthy personnel.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)359-364
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Volume71
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Oral Surgery
Tooth
Aerosols
Air
Tooth Extraction
Immunocompromised Host
Hematologic Tests
Cross Infection
Mouth

Keywords

  • Aerosol
  • Dental settings
  • Occupational infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Ishihama, K., Koizumi, H., Wada, T., Iida, S., Tanaka, S., Yamanishi, T., ... Kogo, M. (2009). Evidence of aerosolised floating blood mist during oral surgery. Journal of Hospital Infection, 71(4), 359-364. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2008.12.005

Evidence of aerosolised floating blood mist during oral surgery. / Ishihama, K.; Koizumi, H.; Wada, T.; Iida, Seiji; Tanaka, S.; Yamanishi, T.; Enomoto, A.; Kogo, M.

In: Journal of Hospital Infection, Vol. 71, No. 4, 04.2009, p. 359-364.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ishihama, K, Koizumi, H, Wada, T, Iida, S, Tanaka, S, Yamanishi, T, Enomoto, A & Kogo, M 2009, 'Evidence of aerosolised floating blood mist during oral surgery', Journal of Hospital Infection, vol. 71, no. 4, pp. 359-364. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2008.12.005
Ishihama, K. ; Koizumi, H. ; Wada, T. ; Iida, Seiji ; Tanaka, S. ; Yamanishi, T. ; Enomoto, A. ; Kogo, M. / Evidence of aerosolised floating blood mist during oral surgery. In: Journal of Hospital Infection. 2009 ; Vol. 71, No. 4. pp. 359-364.
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