Evaluation of pharmaceutical lifesaving skills training oriented pharmaceutical intervention

Yoshito Zamami, Toru Imai, Masaki Imanishi, Kenshi Takechi, Naoko Shiraishi, Toshihiro Koyama, Hidenori Sagara, Yasukazu Shiino, Toshiaki Sendo, Keisuke Ishizawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Many pharmacists are participating in team-based medical care in emergency hospitals. Therefore, there is a desperate need to improve the education system. In the present study, we provided a "pharmaceutical lifesaving skills training" to the students in their fifth and sixth year of the pharmaceutical school and evaluated the program's impact on the students' learning and confidence in their ability to perform pharmaceutical interventions for emergency patients. Methods: We conducted a pharmaceutical lifesaving skills training program with 12 participants who were in their fifth and six year of pharmaceutical school. We prepared a fictional scenario in which a patient with cardiac arrest has been rushed into a hospital. We measured the participants' level of knowledge of pharmaceutical lifesaving procedures and participants' confidence to perform pharmaceutical interventions before and after the training session. Using the data obtained from type II quantification method, we examined what elements in the content of the pharmaceutical lifesaving skill training attended by pharmacy students will affect the students' confidence to perform pharmaceutical interventions. In addition, using the correspondence structural analysis, we examined which sections of the content of the pharmaceutical lifesaving skill training should be improved in the future. Results: When we evaluated the level of knowledge acquired in pharmaceutical lifesaving skills training, the post-training overall correct answer rate was significantly higher than the pre-training overall correct answer rate. And also, level of participants' confidence to perform pharmaceutical interventions similarly increased after pharmaceutical lifesaving skill training. The influence degree graph indicates that the items likely to have a major impact on the participants' confidence to perform pharmaceutical interventions was "Selecting medicine". According to the correspondence structural analysis graph based on the questionnaire survey, one item identified as an improvement required was "Selecting medicine". Conclusions: Our high-performance patient simulator-based lifesaving skills training program not only increased the participants' understanding of the training content but also increased their confidence in their ability to perform pharmaceutical interventions. Therefore, the pharmaceutical lifesaving skills training program we developed will contribute to the education of emergency care pharmacists who can perform pharmaceutical interventions for emergency patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number21
JournalJournal of Pharmaceutical Health Care and Sciences
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 7 2016

Keywords

  • Correspondence structural analysis
  • Pharmaceutical lifesaving skills training
  • Simulation education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology (nursing)

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