Estrogen determines sex differences in airway responsiveness after allergen exposure

Shigeki Matsubara, Christina H. Swasey, Joan E. Loader, Azzeddine Dakhama, Anthony Joetham, Hiroshi Ohnishi, Annette Balhorn, Nobuaki Miyahara, Katsuyuki Takeda, Erwin W. Gelfand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The female hormone estrogen is an important factor in the regulation of airway function and inflammation, and sex differences in the prevalence of asthma are well described. Using an animal model, we determined how sex differences may underlie the development of altered airway function in response to allergen exposure. We compared sex differences in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) after allergen exposure exclusively via the airways. Ovalbumin (OVA) was administered by nebulization on 10 consecutive days in BALB/c mice. After methacholine challenge, significant AHR developed in male mice but not in female mice. Ovariectomized female mice showed significant AHR after 10-day OVA inhalation. ICI182,780, an estrogen antagonist, similarly enhanced airway responsiveness even when administered 1 hour before assay. In contrast, 17β-estradiol dose-dependently suppressed AHR in male mice. In all cases, airway responsiveness was inhibited by the administration of a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist. These results demonstrate that sex differences in 10-day OVA-induced AHR are due to endogenous estrogen, which negatively regulates airway responsiveness in female mice. Cumulatively, the results suggest that endogenous estrogen may regulate the neurokinin 1-dependent prejunctional activation of airway smooth muscle in allergen-exposed mice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)501-508
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sex Characteristics
Allergens
Estrogens
Ovalbumin
Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists
Estrogen Antagonists
Methacholine Chloride
Inhalation
Smooth Muscle
Estradiol
Asthma
Animal Models
Neurokinin-1 Receptors
Hormones
Inflammation
Muscle
Assays
Animals
Chemical activation

Keywords

  • Airway hyperresponsiveness
  • EFS
  • Estrogen
  • Neuronal activation
  • Sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Matsubara, S., Swasey, C. H., Loader, J. E., Dakhama, A., Joetham, A., Ohnishi, H., ... Gelfand, E. W. (2008). Estrogen determines sex differences in airway responsiveness after allergen exposure. American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, 38(5), 501-508. https://doi.org/10.1165/rcmb.2007-0298OC

Estrogen determines sex differences in airway responsiveness after allergen exposure. / Matsubara, Shigeki; Swasey, Christina H.; Loader, Joan E.; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Joetham, Anthony; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Balhorn, Annette; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Gelfand, Erwin W.

In: American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, Vol. 38, No. 5, 01.05.2008, p. 501-508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsubara, S, Swasey, CH, Loader, JE, Dakhama, A, Joetham, A, Ohnishi, H, Balhorn, A, Miyahara, N, Takeda, K & Gelfand, EW 2008, 'Estrogen determines sex differences in airway responsiveness after allergen exposure', American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, vol. 38, no. 5, pp. 501-508. https://doi.org/10.1165/rcmb.2007-0298OC
Matsubara, Shigeki ; Swasey, Christina H. ; Loader, Joan E. ; Dakhama, Azzeddine ; Joetham, Anthony ; Ohnishi, Hiroshi ; Balhorn, Annette ; Miyahara, Nobuaki ; Takeda, Katsuyuki ; Gelfand, Erwin W. / Estrogen determines sex differences in airway responsiveness after allergen exposure. In: American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology. 2008 ; Vol. 38, No. 5. pp. 501-508.
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