Ergonomics of steering wheel mounted switch-how number and arrangement of steering wheel mounted switches interactively affects performance

Atsuo Murata, Makoto Moriwaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, the use of steering wheel mounted switches has been receiving attention. Such switches allow a driver to maintain his or her focus on the road. If the number of steering wheel mounted switches or their arrangement is improper, the advantage of using them may be diminished, and many operator errors may occur. The objective of this study was to examine how the number of steering wheel mounted switches and their arrangement interactively affected a driver's performance. The participants were required to press a specified switch while performing a first-order tracking task. The number of steering wheel mounted switches affected the reaction time in the switch operation task. With regard to the method of arranging the steering wheel mounted switches, the cross-type arrangement was more effective than a vertical-type arrangement. The cross-type arrangement with three steering wheel mounted switches provided the best performance and highest psychological rating. Relevance to industry: Cars equipped with steering wheel mounted switches are increasing. However, the number and arrangement of switches differ among automobile manufacturers, and there are no specific design guidelines on the number and arrangement of steering wheel mounted switches. Such guidelines would contribute to safety and efficiency by determining the optimum number of steering wheel mounted switches and their arrangement. Consequently, such a study would be expected to result in a reduction in driver errors and vehicle accidents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1011-1020
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Industrial Ergonomics
Volume35
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Human Engineering
Ergonomics
ergonomics
Wheels
Switches
Guidelines
Automobiles
Reaction Time
Accidents
performance
Industry
Psychology
Efficiency
Safety
driver
motor vehicle
accident
rating
road
efficiency

Keywords

  • Arrangement of switches
  • Error
  • Number of switches
  • Reaction time
  • Steering wheel mounted switch

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

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