Epilepsy with Electrical Status Epilepticus During Slow Sleep and Secondary Bilateral Synchrony

Katsuhiro Kobayashi, Naohiro Nishibayashi, Yoko Ohtsuka, Eiji Oka, Shunsuke Ohtahara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: In 3 children with “epilepsy with electrical status epilepticus during slow sleep” (ESES), we estimated interhemispheric small time differences (TDs) during spike‐wave activity in EEG by coherence and phase analysis by the two‐dimensional autoregressive model to differentiate their continuous diffuse spike‐waves during slow‐wave sleep (CSWS) between primary bilateral synchrony and secondary bilateral synchrony (SBS). Maximal TDs at onset of apparently bilateral synchronous spike‐wave bursts (BSSWs) during slow‐wave sleep were 12·0–26·5 ms (mean 20·3 ms) with consistent leading hemispheres in eight bursts of the 3 patients, indicating SBS as pathophysiology of their CSWS. This suggestion was supported by their clinico‐EEG findings, including the effect of a single oral dose of clobazam (CLB) on EEG. Three ictal BSSWs of atypical absence seizures in 2 patients were also analyzed to obtain maximal TDs of 17·9–41·7 ms (mean 26·3 ms) at onset, with the same leading sides as in sleep, also indicating SBS. Examination of intraburst TD variations showed no consistent disappearance of TDs during the latter part of the bursts, in either sleep or the ictal EEGs of atypical absences, and a role of the corpus callosum was suggested in the generation of SBS in ESES.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1097-1103
Number of pages7
JournalEpilepsia
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1994

Keywords

  • Children
  • Electroencephalog
  • Epilepsy with continuous spike waves during slow wave sleep
  • Epilepsy with electrical status epilepticus during slow sleep
  • Sleep
  • raphy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Epilepsy with Electrical Status Epilepticus During Slow Sleep and Secondary Bilateral Synchrony'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this