Endoscopic saphenous vein harvesting for hemodialysis vascular access creation in the forearm

A new approach for arteriovenous bridge graft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When superficial arm veins are not suitable to create a native arteriovenous (AV) fistula, an arteriovenous bridge graft by native and/or prosthetic graft is the next best alternative. However, harvesting a native vein, such as the saphenous vein (SV), is invasive and requires a large incision. We report an endoscopic saphenous vein harvesting (ESVH) technique combined with forearm bridge grafting as a new approach for vascular access (VA). Methods: We used the Clearglide, Endoscopic Vessel Harvesting System (Eticon, Inc.) for a less invasive SV harvesting technique. Five patients had a SV graft implant and 10 patients had a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft implant in the forearm. Results: The SV was harvested easily in all patients in 46 ± 2 min. There were no wound complications. All SV and PTFE grafts provided satisfactory access within 1 month; however, two declotting procedures in the SV group and five in the PTFE group were required. The PTFE group had two graft infections. Conclusions: It is possible that a combination of ESVH and SV forearm grafting will be one of the new approaches for hemodialysis (HD) access.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-101
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Vascular Access
Volume4
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2003

Fingerprint

Saphenous Vein
Forearm
Blood Vessels
Renal Dialysis
Transplants
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Veins
Arteriovenous Fistula
Arm
Wounds and Injuries
Infection

Keywords

  • Endoscopic harvest
  • Hemodialysis
  • Saphenous
  • Vascular access

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

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title = "Endoscopic saphenous vein harvesting for hemodialysis vascular access creation in the forearm: A new approach for arteriovenous bridge graft",
abstract = "When superficial arm veins are not suitable to create a native arteriovenous (AV) fistula, an arteriovenous bridge graft by native and/or prosthetic graft is the next best alternative. However, harvesting a native vein, such as the saphenous vein (SV), is invasive and requires a large incision. We report an endoscopic saphenous vein harvesting (ESVH) technique combined with forearm bridge grafting as a new approach for vascular access (VA). Methods: We used the Clearglide, Endoscopic Vessel Harvesting System (Eticon, Inc.) for a less invasive SV harvesting technique. Five patients had a SV graft implant and 10 patients had a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft implant in the forearm. Results: The SV was harvested easily in all patients in 46 ± 2 min. There were no wound complications. All SV and PTFE grafts provided satisfactory access within 1 month; however, two declotting procedures in the SV group and five in the PTFE group were required. The PTFE group had two graft infections. Conclusions: It is possible that a combination of ESVH and SV forearm grafting will be one of the new approaches for hemodialysis (HD) access.",
keywords = "Endoscopic harvest, Hemodialysis, Saphenous, Vascular access",
author = "Takahiro Oto",
year = "2003",
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language = "English",
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pages = "98--101",
journal = "Journal of Vascular Access",
issn = "1129-7298",
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T1 - Endoscopic saphenous vein harvesting for hemodialysis vascular access creation in the forearm

T2 - A new approach for arteriovenous bridge graft

AU - Oto, Takahiro

PY - 2003/7

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N2 - When superficial arm veins are not suitable to create a native arteriovenous (AV) fistula, an arteriovenous bridge graft by native and/or prosthetic graft is the next best alternative. However, harvesting a native vein, such as the saphenous vein (SV), is invasive and requires a large incision. We report an endoscopic saphenous vein harvesting (ESVH) technique combined with forearm bridge grafting as a new approach for vascular access (VA). Methods: We used the Clearglide, Endoscopic Vessel Harvesting System (Eticon, Inc.) for a less invasive SV harvesting technique. Five patients had a SV graft implant and 10 patients had a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft implant in the forearm. Results: The SV was harvested easily in all patients in 46 ± 2 min. There were no wound complications. All SV and PTFE grafts provided satisfactory access within 1 month; however, two declotting procedures in the SV group and five in the PTFE group were required. The PTFE group had two graft infections. Conclusions: It is possible that a combination of ESVH and SV forearm grafting will be one of the new approaches for hemodialysis (HD) access.

AB - When superficial arm veins are not suitable to create a native arteriovenous (AV) fistula, an arteriovenous bridge graft by native and/or prosthetic graft is the next best alternative. However, harvesting a native vein, such as the saphenous vein (SV), is invasive and requires a large incision. We report an endoscopic saphenous vein harvesting (ESVH) technique combined with forearm bridge grafting as a new approach for vascular access (VA). Methods: We used the Clearglide, Endoscopic Vessel Harvesting System (Eticon, Inc.) for a less invasive SV harvesting technique. Five patients had a SV graft implant and 10 patients had a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft implant in the forearm. Results: The SV was harvested easily in all patients in 46 ± 2 min. There were no wound complications. All SV and PTFE grafts provided satisfactory access within 1 month; however, two declotting procedures in the SV group and five in the PTFE group were required. The PTFE group had two graft infections. Conclusions: It is possible that a combination of ESVH and SV forearm grafting will be one of the new approaches for hemodialysis (HD) access.

KW - Endoscopic harvest

KW - Hemodialysis

KW - Saphenous

KW - Vascular access

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