Endocrine disrupter nonylphenol and bisphenol A contamination in Okinawa and Ishigaki Islands, Japan - Within coral reefs and adjacent river mouths

Hodaka Kawahata, Hidekazu Ohta, Mayuri Inoue, Atsushi Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Certain chemicals possess the potential to modulate endocrine systems, and thereby interfere with reproduction and developmental processes in the wild. We analyzed endocrine disrupters nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) levels at various sites in Okinawa and Ishigaki Islands, Japan. River-water samples showed undetectable to low concentrations of NP and BPA at most of the sites investigated. However, an appreciable amount of BPA was detected in sediments at one coral reef site. In addition, significant numbers of river sediment samples showed appreciable amounts of NP and BPA. Most of the sampling sites for this study are located within a distance of 1 km from the coral reefs, which are under influence of river-waters to a variable extent. Therefore, influence of endocrine disrupters may have already begun on adjacent coral reefs. Both endocrine disrupters were positively correlated with human population densities, but not with the contents of red soil generated by farm land reformation. Therefore, it is concluded that NP and BPA pollution is a consequence of human waste discharge, both domestic and industrial, and not by agricultural activities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1519-1527
Number of pages9
JournalChemosphere
Volume55
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bisphenol A
  • Coral reef
  • Endocrine disrupter
  • Nonylphenol
  • River-water
  • Sediments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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