Emphysematous changes and lower levels of plasma irisin are associated with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after bilateral living-donor lobar lung transplantation

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Abstract

Purpose: Decreased irisin levels may be associated with the development of emphysema. Similarly, emphysematous changes may develop in patients with chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) after living-donor lobar lung transplantation (LDLLT). We investigated the severity of emphysematous changes and the relationship between irisin levels and CLAD after bilateral LDLLT and cadaveric lung transplantation (CLT). Methods: The subjects of this retrospective study were 59 recipients of bilateral LDLLT (n = 31) or CLT (n = 28), divided into a non-CLAD group (n = 41), a LDLLT-CLAD group (n = 11), and a CLT-CLAD group (n = 7). We compared the severity of emphysematous changes, the skeletal muscle mass, and the plasma irisin levels among the groups. Results: The emphysematous changes were significantly more severe in the LDLLT-CLAD and CLT-CLAD groups (p = 0.046 and 0.036), especially in patients with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), than in the non-CLAD group. Although the skeletal muscle mass was similar in all the groups, the plasma irisin levels were significantly lower in the LDLLT-CLAD group (p = 0.022), especially in the patients with BOS after LDLLT, than in the non-CLAD group. Conclusion: Emphysematous changes and lower levels of plasma irisin were associated with CLAD, especially in patients with BOS, after bilateral LDLLT.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSurgery today
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Chronic lung allograft dysfunction
  • Emphysema
  • Irisin
  • Living-donor
  • Lung transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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