Electric field effect on magnetoresistance angular effects: New tool to study mass renormalization in quasi-one-dimensional organic conductors

Kaya Kobayashi, Eiji Ohmichi, Toshihito Osada

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We discuss a novel experimental method to study mass renormalization in quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) conductors having open sheet-like Fermi surfaces. It is well known that the detailed shape of the sheet-like Fermi surface could be studied by using magetoresistance angular effects, which appear on the interlayer magnetoresistance as a function of magnetic field orientations. We have taken notice of the effect of additional electric fields on the magnetoresistance angular effects. The basic concept is as the followings. In the Q1D system, the interlayer electric field can be replaced with the effective magnetic field, which gives the same Lorentz force to an electron, for each Fermi sheet. So, the angular effects due to different Fermi sheets must show different shifts under electric fields. From this shift, we can directly estimate the Fermi velocity and/or the electron mass in the Q1D conductors. We have numerically checked this electric field effect, and have also experimentally confirmed the electric field effect in organic conductors (TMTSF)2ClO4 and α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4, which have Q1D electron systems at low temperatures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1267-1271
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Physics and Chemistry of Solids
Volume63
Issue number6-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2002
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 8th ISSP International Symposium - Tokyo, Japan
Duration: Nov 2 2001Nov 5 2001

Keywords

  • A. Organic compounds
  • D. Electronic structure
  • D. Fermi surface
  • D. Transport properties

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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