Effects of the low intensity strength training combined with a heat stimulation on maximum muscle strength in knee extensor

Akira Yoshioka, Satoru Sasano, Kazutoshi Seki, Kazuki Nishimura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It is well known that strength training is useful to prevent a decrease of muscle strength and a loss of muscular protein, which is caused a disuse atrophy during the exposure to space or the simulated microgravity environment and a sarcopenia with aging. In previous study, it was clarified that increase temperature of muscle via heat stimulation facilitated muscle hypertrophy. Furthermore, muscle strength training combined with heat stimulation using a heat- and steam-generating sheet facilitated a increase strength and mass of muscles. We hypothesized that a hot water as well as heat- and stream-generating sheet facilitated a strength training induced physical response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low intensity strength training combined with a heat stimulation using hot water immersion on maximum muscle strength in knee extensor in young. Seven healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The legs of each subject divided into two groups at random; 1) a group that performed muscle strength training after immersion in hot water (38.0 (SD: 0.5) degrees Celsius): Heat Stimulation condition (HS condition), and 2) a group that performed muscle strength training without heat stimulation: Control condition (C condition). The single knee extension/flexion strength training was carried out 4 days a week, for 8 weeks, which is 3 sets (30 repetitions). The intensity of strength training was less than 30 repetition maximum. Six and eight week after the training, the maximum knee extensor strength in HS condition was significantly increased compared with the level of that before training. However, the maximum strength in C condition did not increase. These data suggested that the low intensity strength training combined with heat stimulation using hot water might facilitate increase in muscle strength.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-32
Number of pages4
JournalJapanese Journal of Aerospace and Environmental Medicine
Volume46
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Resistance Training
Muscle Strength
Knee
Hot Temperature
Water
Immersion
Atrophic Muscular Disorders
Sarcopenia
Weightlessness
Muscles
Steam
Hypertrophy
Leg
Temperature

Keywords

  • Heat stimulation
  • Hot water
  • Knee extensor
  • Low intensity training
  • Strength training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Effects of the low intensity strength training combined with a heat stimulation on maximum muscle strength in knee extensor. / Yoshioka, Akira; Sasano, Satoru; Seki, Kazutoshi; Nishimura, Kazuki.

In: Japanese Journal of Aerospace and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 46, No. 2, 06.2009, p. 29-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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