Effects of removal of chicks from hens on concentrations of prolactin, luteinizing hormone and oestradiol in plasma of brooding Gifujidori hens

T. Kuwayama, K. Shimada, N. Saito, T. Ohkubo, K. Sato, M. Wada, K. Ichinoe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gifujidori hens were allowed to repeat a breeding cycle in one season. In the first breeding cycle the duration of the brooding (raising chicks) stage was limited to 3 weeks, whereas in the second breeding cycle it was limited to 1 week by removing all chicks from mother hens. In the first breeding cycle, plasma prolactin (PRL) was high during the incubation period, but rapidly decreased on the day of hatching and reached minimum values about 1 week after hatching. In contrast, plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations were low during the incubation period, but after hatching they gradually increased and reached peak values immediately after removal of chicks. Concentrations of oestradiol in plasma were low in the incubation and brooding stages but increased significantly immediately after removal of chicks. In the second breeding cycle, changes in PRL and LH concentrations were similar to those observed in the first breeding cycle except that even greater increases in plasma LH and oestradiol concentrations were observed one week after hatching when the chicks were removed. These results suggest that coexistence of newly hatched chicks may suppress LH secretion from the pituitary of the hen in the natural breeding cyc]e.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)617-622
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Reproduction and Fertility
Volume95
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chicks
  • Hen
  • LH
  • Oestradiol
  • Prolactin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Embryology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Developmental Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of removal of chicks from hens on concentrations of prolactin, luteinizing hormone and oestradiol in plasma of brooding Gifujidori hens'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this