Effects of multi-context information recorded at different regions in holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal on optical reconfiguration

Akifumi Ogiwara, Minoru Watanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) memory to record multi-context information for an optically reconfigurable gate array is formed by constructing a laser illumination system to implement successive laser exposures at different small regions in a glass cell filled with LC composites. The context pattern arrangements for circuit information are designed in a 3 ' 3 in.2 photomask by electron beam lithography, and they are recorded as laser interference patterns at nine regions separated in an HPDLC sample by a laser interferometer composed of movable pinhole and photomask plates placed on motorized stages. The multi-context information reconstructed from the different regions in the HPDLC is written to a photodiode array in a gate-array VLSI by switching only the position of laser irradiation using the displacement of the pinhole plate under the control of a personal computer (PC). The effects of multi-context information recorded at different regions in the HPDLC on optical reconfiguration are discussed in terms of the optical system composed of ORGA VLSI and HPDLC memory. The internal structures in the HPDLC memory formed by multi-context recording are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, and the configurations composed of LC and polymer phases are revealed at various regions in the HPDLC memory.

Original languageEnglish
Article number08RG04
JournalJapanese Journal of Applied Physics
Volume55
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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