Effects of Medium-chain Fatty Acids and Their Acylglycerols on the Transport of Penicillin V across Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

Motohiro Shima, Kaori Yohdoh, Masayo Yamaguchi, Yukitaka Kimura, Shuji Adachi, Ryuichi Matsuno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The transport-enhancing effects of medium-chain fatty acids (caproic, caprylic, and capric acids) and their acylglycerols (mono-, di-, and triacylglycerols) were investigated by using Caco-2 cell monolayers as a model of the human intestinal epithelium. Penicillin V was used as a model for a hydrophilic bioactive compound. Among the fatty acids and acylglycerols tested, 1,2-dicaproin, monocaprin, monocaprylin, and capric acid sodium salt effectively enhanced the transport rate, whereas other substances enhanced the rate only slightly or not at all. With each of these four substances, the rate of enhancement was proportional to the concentration at low concentrations, but leveled off at high concentrations. The transport-enhancing effects were well correlated with the reduction in surface tension and with a physico-chemical parameter, denoted by the surface energy-lowering coefficient, characterizing the surface activity of a substance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1150-1155
Number of pages6
JournalBioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry
Volume61
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

penicillin V
Penicillin V
Glycerides
decanoic acid
medium chain fatty acids
Caco-2 Cells
acylglycerols
Diglycerides
diacylglycerols
Fatty acids
Monolayers
Decanoic Acids
Caproates
Triglycerides
Fatty Acids
Caprylates
triacylglycerols
hexanoic acid
octanoic acid
Surface Tension

Keywords

  • Caco-2
  • Medium-chain fatty acids and acylglycerols
  • Surface activity; physico-chemical property
  • Transepithelial transport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Biotechnology
  • Chemistry (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Effects of Medium-chain Fatty Acids and Their Acylglycerols on the Transport of Penicillin V across Caco-2 Cell Monolayers. / Shima, Motohiro; Yohdoh, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Masayo; Kimura, Yukitaka; Adachi, Shuji; Matsuno, Ryuichi.

In: Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry, Vol. 61, No. 7, 07.1997, p. 1150-1155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shima, Motohiro ; Yohdoh, Kaori ; Yamaguchi, Masayo ; Kimura, Yukitaka ; Adachi, Shuji ; Matsuno, Ryuichi. / Effects of Medium-chain Fatty Acids and Their Acylglycerols on the Transport of Penicillin V across Caco-2 Cell Monolayers. In: Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry. 1997 ; Vol. 61, No. 7. pp. 1150-1155.
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