Effects of Low-Intensity Exercise in the Morning on Physiological Responses during Unsteady Workload Exercise in the Evening

Kazuki Nishimura, Koji Nagasaki, Hidetaka Yamaguchi, Akira Yoshioka, Sho Onodera, Noboru Takamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Nishimura, K, Nagasaki, K, Yamaguchi, H, Yoshioka, A, Onodera, S, and Takamoto, N. Effects of low-intensity exercise in the morning on physiological responses during unsteady workload exercise in the evening. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1735-1742, 2016 - This study examined the effects of low-intensity morning exercise (ME) on physiological response during unsteady workload evening exercise. Nine healthy men participated in the following 2 experimental conditions: 15 minutes of bicycle exercise at 40% maximum oxygen consumption (Vo 2 max) in the morning (the ME condition) and rest (control [C] condition). Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), temperature, oxygen uptake, and natural logarithm of high frequency, an index of cardiac parasympathetic modulation, were measured before evening exercises, which were performed for 32 minutes in 2 parts: The steady-state exercise test included three 4-min bouts of exercise at 20, 60, and 40% Vo 2 max. The unsteady exercise test consisted of 4-min bouts of exercise with gradual increases and decreases in workload at 20 and 60% Vo 2 max. Heart rate, BP, and oxygen uptake were measured in both experiments. Maximal and minimal values, amplitude, and phase lags were measured with each cycle of unsteady workload exercise. With steady-state exercise, HR and systolic BP at 60 and 40% Vo 2 max were significantly lower in the ME condition than in the C condition. However, oxygen uptake was not significantly different between the 2 conditions. With unsteady exercise, the HR and oxygen uptake phase lags were significantly shorter and the amplitude of oxygen intake was significantly larger in the ME condition than in the C condition. There were no significant differences in physiological parameters between the conditions at rest or during recovery. The physiological response during evening exercise is enhanced by low-intensity ME, which might be an effective conditioning method on a sporting event day.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1735-1742
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2016

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Workload
Exercise
Oxygen
Heart Rate
Blood Pressure
Exercise Test
Oxygen Consumption

Keywords

  • amplitude
  • blood pressure
  • heart rate
  • oxygen uptake
  • phase lags

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effects of Low-Intensity Exercise in the Morning on Physiological Responses during Unsteady Workload Exercise in the Evening. / Nishimura, Kazuki; Nagasaki, Koji; Yamaguchi, Hidetaka; Yoshioka, Akira; Onodera, Sho; Takamoto, Noboru.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 30, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 1735-1742.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nishimura, Kazuki ; Nagasaki, Koji ; Yamaguchi, Hidetaka ; Yoshioka, Akira ; Onodera, Sho ; Takamoto, Noboru. / Effects of Low-Intensity Exercise in the Morning on Physiological Responses during Unsteady Workload Exercise in the Evening. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2016 ; Vol. 30, No. 6. pp. 1735-1742.
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