Effects of fluoride on the calcium phosphate precipitation method for dentinal tubule occlusion.

T. Suge, K. Ishikawa, Masahiro Yoshiyama, M. Yoshiyama, K. Asaoka, S. Ebisu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Use of the calcium phosphate precipitation (CPP) method makes possible the occlusion of dentinal tubules to approximately 10 to 15 microns from the dentinal surface, and thus shows good potential for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. The precipitate formed in the dentinal tubules by the CPP method is, however, not apatite [HAP; Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2], a component of tooth and bone, but dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD; CaHPO4.2H2O). Since fluoride enhances the conversion of DCPD to HAP, we evaluated the effects of fluoride on the texture of the precipitate formed by the CPP method and on its capacity to occlude dentinal tubules in this in vitro study. CPP solution (1.0 mol/L CaHPO4.2H2O dissolved in 2.0 mol/L H3PO4) was applied to a dentin disk and was subsequently neutralized with a post-treatment solution (1 mol/L NaOH, from 0 to 0.1 mol/L NaF). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the precipitate occluded dentinal tubules to a depth of approximately 10 to 15 microns from the dentinal surface, regardless of the NaF concentration (from 0 to 0.1 mol/L) in the post-treatment solution. Also, dentin permeability was reduced to 15% by the CPP treatment regardless of the NaF concentration. The Ca/P molar ratio of the precipitate, measured by x-ray micro-analysis, was higher (1.25 +/- 0.04) in the presence of NaF than in its absence (1.03 +/- 0.01). For further identification of the precipitate formed in the dentinal tubules, the same procedure was used in glass tubes (diameter, 1 mm), so that a larger amount of precipitate would be obtained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1079-1085
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Dental Research
Volume74
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fluorides
Tooth Components
Dentin Permeability
Dentin Sensitivity
Apatites
Dentin
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Glass
X-Rays
calcium phosphate
Bone and Bones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Suge, T., Ishikawa, K., Yoshiyama, M., Yoshiyama, M., Asaoka, K., & Ebisu, S. (1995). Effects of fluoride on the calcium phosphate precipitation method for dentinal tubule occlusion. Journal of Dental Research, 74(4), 1079-1085.

Effects of fluoride on the calcium phosphate precipitation method for dentinal tubule occlusion. / Suge, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Yoshiyama, Masahiro; Yoshiyama, M.; Asaoka, K.; Ebisu, S.

In: Journal of Dental Research, Vol. 74, No. 4, 04.1995, p. 1079-1085.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suge, T, Ishikawa, K, Yoshiyama, M, Yoshiyama, M, Asaoka, K & Ebisu, S 1995, 'Effects of fluoride on the calcium phosphate precipitation method for dentinal tubule occlusion.', Journal of Dental Research, vol. 74, no. 4, pp. 1079-1085.
Suge, T. ; Ishikawa, K. ; Yoshiyama, Masahiro ; Yoshiyama, M. ; Asaoka, K. ; Ebisu, S. / Effects of fluoride on the calcium phosphate precipitation method for dentinal tubule occlusion. In: Journal of Dental Research. 1995 ; Vol. 74, No. 4. pp. 1079-1085.
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