Effects of extraction and reconstitution of ryegrass juice on fermentation, digestion and in situ degradation of pressed cake silage

Naoki Nishino, Keiko Miyase, Mitsuaki Ohshima, Hiro Omi Yokota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primary growth of Italian ryegrass was fractionated into green juice and pressed cake (PC). PC was ensiled either directly or after reconstitution with the juice which was spray dried and then added to water before ensiling (RPC). This process was aimed at distinguishing between chemical (removal of nutrients) and physical (mechanical disintegration) effects of fractionation. Two additional wilted silages were prepared from long cut or chopped Italian ryegrass (WL and WC, respectively). The fermentative quality, digestion and in situ degradation of dry matter for the four silages were compared. WC, RPC and PC silages indicated lactate-rich fermentation while WL silage had a comparatively low lactate content. PC silage had a lower (P <0.05) pH value with lower (P <0.05) amounts of organic acids compared with WC and RPC silage, suggesting that removal of buffering components with the juice had greater effects than shredding on fermentation of PC silage. The digestibility of protein was lower (P <0.05) in PC than WL silage but the reduction was compensated for in RPC silage. Ruminal concentrations of total volatile fatty acids were the highest (P <0.05) when goats fed WL silage while those on the other silages had similar concentrations. Ruminal pH was lower (P <0.05) in goats fed PC than WC silage and the difference was not fully reversed by reconstituting the juice to PC. Juice extraction decreased (P <0.05) the soluble fraction and the rate of disappearance of dry matter in the rumen but the potential degradability was not different among treatments. These results suggest that both chemical and physical changes due to the fractionation affect the characteristics of digestion of PC silage while the removal of nutrients has a major role in the modified silage fermentation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-166
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Volume75
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1997

Fingerprint

Lolium
Silage
silage
Fermentation
juices
Digestion
digestion
fermentation
Fractionation
Degradation
Nutrients
degradation
Lactic Acid
Volatile Fatty Acids
Disintegration
Organic acids
Water
Lolium multiflorum
Goats
lactates

Keywords

  • Italian ryegrass
  • Juice extraction
  • Pressed cake
  • Silage fermentation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science
  • Chemistry (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Effects of extraction and reconstitution of ryegrass juice on fermentation, digestion and in situ degradation of pressed cake silage. / Nishino, Naoki; Miyase, Keiko; Ohshima, Mitsuaki; Yokota, Hiro Omi.

In: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, Vol. 75, No. 2, 10.1997, p. 161-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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