Effects of cultivation period on catch crop chemical composition and potential for bioenergy production

S. Akao, D. Yasutake, K. Kondo, Hideaki Nagare, Morihiro Maeda, T. Fujiwara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The first step in biofuel and/or bio-based bulk chemical material production is assessing the amounts of useful substances in a potential biomass. Sugar, nutrients, ash, and functional ingredients (such as antioxidant compounds) in premature dent corn biomass cultivated as a catch crop (plant density; 60 shoots m−2) over different cultivation periods (29 days, 49 days, 83 days) were investigated. The sugar recovery amount was estimated by multiplying two regression curves (saccharification efficiency curve, quadratic regression curve; dry weight growth curve, Gompertz curve). A simple economic analysis for ethanol production from the catch crop biomass was also carried out using previously reported process costs and the estimated sugar recovery amount. High plant density led to accumulation of plant biomass providing high amounts of plant dry weight and derived sugars per unit area. About 2700 g DW m−2 (about 1400 g sugar m−2) was harvested in the 49-day cultivation. The amount is significant compared with biomass yields of other candidates for energy crops. The estimated sugar recovery amount reached its maximum value near the end of experimental period (79-day cultivation). The longer cultivation period was better for sugar recovery although there was a slight decrease in saccharification efficiency with cultivation time. Based on the economic analysis, a higher ethanol price (about 200% higher than the current wholesale price) would be required for catch crop financial independence with around 50-day cultivation. Production of ethanol from catch crop biomass would not be feasible in the current situation. However, condensed biomass production through catch crops is still attractive and requires further research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)787-793
Number of pages7
JournalIndustrial Crops and Products
Volume111
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

catch crops
bioenergy
chemical composition
sugars
biomass
saccharification
ethanol production
economic analysis
plant density
dent corn
energy crops
biofuels
biomass production
ingredients
ethanol
antioxidants
shoots
nutrients
crops

Keywords

  • Biomass growth curve
  • Corn biomass
  • Energy crop
  • Functional ingredients
  • Sugar recovery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Effects of cultivation period on catch crop chemical composition and potential for bioenergy production. / Akao, S.; Yasutake, D.; Kondo, K.; Nagare, Hideaki; Maeda, Morihiro; Fujiwara, T.

In: Industrial Crops and Products, Vol. 111, 01.01.2018, p. 787-793.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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