Effectiveness of scheduled intravenous acetaminophen in the postoperative pain management of video-assisted thoracic surgery

Yoshinobu Shikatani, Junichi Soh, Kazuhiko Shien, Takeshi Kurosaki, Shinji Ohtani, Hiromasa Yamamoto, Arata Taniguchi, Mikio Okazaki, Seiichiro Sugimoto, Masaomi Yamane, Takahiro Oto, Hiroshi Morimatsu, Shinichi Toyooka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The scheduled administration of intravenous acetaminophen (scheduled-IV-AcA) is one of the more effective multimodal analgesic approaches for postoperative pain in abdominal/orthopedic surgeries. However, there is little evidence concerning scheduled-IV-AcA after general thoracic surgery, especially when limited to video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). We investigated the efficacy of scheduled-IV-AcA administration in patients after undergoing VATS. Methods: Ninety-nine patients who underwent VATS lobectomy or segmentectomy via an 8-cm access window and 1 camera port were retrospectively reviewed by categorizing them into groups either with scheduled-IV-AcA (Group AcA: n = 29) or without it (Group non-AcA: n = 70). Group AcA received 1 g of IV-AcA every 6 h from the end of the operation until the end of POD2. Postoperative pain was measured using a numeric rating scale (NRS) three times per day until discharge. Results: NRS scores were significantly lower in Group AcA with motion (on POD1 to the first point of POD2) than in Group non-AcA. Group non-AcA was also more likely to use additional analgesics than Group AcA (39% vs. 17%, p = 0.058). Conclusions: Scheduled-IV-AcA administration is a safe and effective multimodal analgesic approach in patients undergoing VATS pulmonary resection via an 8-cm access window.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSurgery today
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Intravenous acetaminophen
  • Multimodal analgesia
  • Postoperative pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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