Effect of nasal speaking valve on speech intelligibility under velopharyngeal incompetence: A questionnaire survey

S. Mikamo, N. Kodama, Q. Pan, N. Maeda, S. Minagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Velopharyngeal incompetence is known as a contributing factor to speech disorders. Suwaki et al. reported that nasal speaking valve (NSV) could improve dysarthria by regulating nasal emission utilising one-way valve. However, disease or condition which would be susceptible to treatment by NSV has not been clarified yet. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of NSV by questionnaire survey using ready-made NSV. Subjects were recruited through the internet bulletin, and NSV survey set was sent to the applicant. Sixty-six participants, who agreed to participate in this study, used NSV and mailed back the questionnaire which included self-evaluation and third-party evaluation of speech intelligibility. Statistical analysis revealed that the use of NSV resulted in significant speech intelligibility improvement in both self-evaluation and third-party evaluation (P < 0·01). Regarding the type of underlying disease of dysarthria, significant effect of NSV on self-evaluation of speech intelligibility could be observed in cerebrovascular disease and neurodegenerative disease (P < 0·01) and that on third-party evaluation in neurodegenerative disease (P < 0·01). Eighty-six percent of subjects showed improvement of speech intelligibility by shutting up nostrils by fingers, and the significant effect of NSV on both self-evaluation and third-party evaluation of speech intelligibility was observed (P < 0·001). From the results of this study, it was suggested that NSV would be effective in cerebrovascular disease and neurodegenerative disease, as well as in subjects whose speech intelligibility was improved by closing nostrils.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)136-143
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of oral rehabilitation
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2015

Keywords

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Articulation
  • Cerebrovascular disease
  • Questionnaires
  • Speech intelligibility
  • Velopharyngeal incompetence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

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