Effect of embolic particles during coronary interventional procedures on regional wall motion in patients with stable angina pectoris

Yoshiharu Higuchi, Katsuomi Iwakura, Atsunori Okamura, Motoo Date, Hiroyuki Nagai, Makito Ozawa, Hiroshi Ito, Kenshi Fujii

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microembolization during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) causes minor myocardial injury, and a Doppler guidewire can detect embolic particles as high-intensity transient signals (HITS). The present study investigated the effect of microembolization during PCI on regional wall motion using a Doppler guidewire and myocardial strain analysis. We performed PCI to the left anterior descending coronary artery in 25 patients (18 men and 7 women, 68 ± 8 years old) with stable angina pectoris. Coronary flow spectrums were obtained with a Doppler guidewire to count the total number of HITS throughout the PCI procedures. On the days before and after PCI, we recorded echocardiography and measured the longitudinal peak systolic strain, peak strain rate, and early diastolic strain rate in the left anterior descending territory using a 2-dimensional speckle tracking method. PCI was successfully performed, and 10 ± 6 HITS (range 0 to 22, median 9) were recognized during PCI. The echocardiographic study showed no visible wall motion abnormalities in the left anterior descending territory either after or before PCI. In cases in which the total number of HITS was ≥10, the peak systolic strain, peak strain rate, and early diastolic strain rate worsened on the day after PCI compared with those on the day before PCI (p <0.01). The rates of change in peak systolic strain and early diastolic strain rate, defined as the ratios of those parameters after PCI to those before PCI, had modest to strong inverse correlations with the total number of HITS (R 2 = 0.35 and R 2 = 0.46, respectively). In conclusion, periprocedural microembolization during PCI reduces subclinical cardiac function in patients with stable angina pectoris.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1142-1147
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume109
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 15 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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