Early detection of cognitive decline in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease with a novel eye tracking test

Koh Tadokoro, Toru Yamashita, Yusuke Fukui, Emi Nomura, Yasuyuki Ohta, Setsuko Ueno, Saya Nishina, Keiichiro Tsunoda, Yosuke Wakutani, Yoshiki Takao, Takahiro Miyoshi, Yasuto Higashi, Yosuke Osakada, Ryo Sasaki, Namiko Matsumoto, Yuko Kawahara, Yosio Omote, Mami Takemoto, Nozomi Hishikawa, Ryuta MoriharaKoji Abe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Due to an increasing number of dementia patients, the development of a rapid and sensitive method for cognitive assessment is awaited. Here, we examined the usefulness of a novel and short (3 min) eye tracking device to evaluate the cognitive function of normal control (NC, n = 52), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 52), and Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 70) subjects. Eye tracking total score declined significantly in MCI (**p < 0.01 vs NC) and AD (**p < 0.01 vs NC, ##p < 0.01 vs MCI), and correlated well with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score (r = 0.57, *p < 0.05). Furthermore, the eye tracking test, especially memory and deductive reasoning tasks, effectively discriminated NC, MCI and AD. The present novel eye tracking test clearly discriminated cognitive functions among NC, MCI, and AD subjects, thereby providing an advantage for the early detection of MCI and AD in screening.

Original languageEnglish
Article number117529
JournalJournal of the neurological sciences
Volume427
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 15 2021

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Cognitive assessment
  • Eye tracking technology
  • Mild cognitive impairment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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