Early childhood exposure to maternal smoking and behavioral development

Makiko Ariyoshi, Toshiharu Mitsuhashi, Naomi Matsumoto, Kazue Nakamura, Takashi Yorifuji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined the association between early childhood exposure to maternal smoking and behavioral issues at 8 years old using a large nationwide population-based longitudinal survey in Japan that began in 2001. We included 46,737 children with information about maternal smoking taken from the 6-month survey. We used logistic regression analysis to examine the hypothesis. Early childhood exposure to maternal smoking increased the risk of behavioral problems related to attention and aggressive or disruptive behavior. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.37 (1.22–1.54) for inability to wait their turn during play and 1.40 (1.27–1.55) for destroying toys and, compared with children of nonsmoking mothers. Children of mothers who were heavy smokers were more likely to develop behavioral problems than others. Stopping early childhood exposure to maternal exposure can protect children’s neurodevelopment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalArchives of Environmental and Occupational Health
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • behavioral problems
  • Early childhood exposure
  • Epidemiology
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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