Dynamic mislocalizations of nuclear pore complex proteins after focal cerebral ischemia in rat

Qian Li, Yasuyuki Ohta, Toru Yamashita, Jingwei Shang, Kentaro Deguchi, Tian Feng, Kota Sato, Nozomi Hishikawa, Yumiko Nakano, Koji Abe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) play an important role in coordinating the transport of proteins and nucleic acids between the nucleus and cytoplasm, and are therefore essential for maintaining normal cellular function and liability. In the present study, we investigated the temporal immunohistochemical distribution of five representative components of NPCs-Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 (RanGap1), glycoprotein-210 (Gp210), nucleoporin 205 (Nup205), nucleoporin 107 (Nup107), and nucleoporin 50 (Nup50)-after 90min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) up to 28 days after the reperfusion in rat brains. Single immunohistochemical analyses showed ring-like stainings along the periphery of the nucleus in sham control brains. After tMCAO, Gp210 and Nup107 immunoreactivity continuously increased from 1 day, and RanGap1, Nup205, and Nup50 increased from 2 days until 28 days, which also displayed progressive precipitations within the nucleus in the peri-ischemic area, while the ischemic core showed scarce expression with collapsed structure. Double immunofluorescent analyses revealed nuclear retention and apparent colocalization of RanGap1 with Nup205, Gp210 with Nup205, and partial colocalization of Nup205 with Nup107; most of the ischemic changes above were similar to those observed in patients with C9orf72-genetic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Taken together, these observations suggest that the mislocalization of these nucleoporins may be a common pathogenesis of both ischemic and neurodegenerative disease.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016

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Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins
Brain Ischemia
ran GTP-Binding Protein
GTPase-Activating Proteins
Nuclear Pore
Glycoproteins
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Brain
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Nucleic Acids
Reperfusion
Carrier Proteins
Cytoplasm

Keywords

  • Cerebral ischemia
  • Gp210
  • Nup107
  • Nup205
  • Nup50
  • RanGap1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

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title = "Dynamic mislocalizations of nuclear pore complex proteins after focal cerebral ischemia in rat",
abstract = "Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) play an important role in coordinating the transport of proteins and nucleic acids between the nucleus and cytoplasm, and are therefore essential for maintaining normal cellular function and liability. In the present study, we investigated the temporal immunohistochemical distribution of five representative components of NPCs-Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 (RanGap1), glycoprotein-210 (Gp210), nucleoporin 205 (Nup205), nucleoporin 107 (Nup107), and nucleoporin 50 (Nup50)-after 90min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) up to 28 days after the reperfusion in rat brains. Single immunohistochemical analyses showed ring-like stainings along the periphery of the nucleus in sham control brains. After tMCAO, Gp210 and Nup107 immunoreactivity continuously increased from 1 day, and RanGap1, Nup205, and Nup50 increased from 2 days until 28 days, which also displayed progressive precipitations within the nucleus in the peri-ischemic area, while the ischemic core showed scarce expression with collapsed structure. Double immunofluorescent analyses revealed nuclear retention and apparent colocalization of RanGap1 with Nup205, Gp210 with Nup205, and partial colocalization of Nup205 with Nup107; most of the ischemic changes above were similar to those observed in patients with C9orf72-genetic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Taken together, these observations suggest that the mislocalization of these nucleoporins may be a common pathogenesis of both ischemic and neurodegenerative disease.",
keywords = "Cerebral ischemia, Gp210, Nup107, Nup205, Nup50, RanGap1",
author = "Qian Li and Yasuyuki Ohta and Toru Yamashita and Jingwei Shang and Kentaro Deguchi and Tian Feng and Kota Sato and Nozomi Hishikawa and Yumiko Nakano and Koji Abe",
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T1 - Dynamic mislocalizations of nuclear pore complex proteins after focal cerebral ischemia in rat

AU - Li, Qian

AU - Ohta, Yasuyuki

AU - Yamashita, Toru

AU - Shang, Jingwei

AU - Deguchi, Kentaro

AU - Feng, Tian

AU - Sato, Kota

AU - Hishikawa, Nozomi

AU - Nakano, Yumiko

AU - Abe, Koji

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) play an important role in coordinating the transport of proteins and nucleic acids between the nucleus and cytoplasm, and are therefore essential for maintaining normal cellular function and liability. In the present study, we investigated the temporal immunohistochemical distribution of five representative components of NPCs-Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 (RanGap1), glycoprotein-210 (Gp210), nucleoporin 205 (Nup205), nucleoporin 107 (Nup107), and nucleoporin 50 (Nup50)-after 90min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) up to 28 days after the reperfusion in rat brains. Single immunohistochemical analyses showed ring-like stainings along the periphery of the nucleus in sham control brains. After tMCAO, Gp210 and Nup107 immunoreactivity continuously increased from 1 day, and RanGap1, Nup205, and Nup50 increased from 2 days until 28 days, which also displayed progressive precipitations within the nucleus in the peri-ischemic area, while the ischemic core showed scarce expression with collapsed structure. Double immunofluorescent analyses revealed nuclear retention and apparent colocalization of RanGap1 with Nup205, Gp210 with Nup205, and partial colocalization of Nup205 with Nup107; most of the ischemic changes above were similar to those observed in patients with C9orf72-genetic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Taken together, these observations suggest that the mislocalization of these nucleoporins may be a common pathogenesis of both ischemic and neurodegenerative disease.

AB - Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) play an important role in coordinating the transport of proteins and nucleic acids between the nucleus and cytoplasm, and are therefore essential for maintaining normal cellular function and liability. In the present study, we investigated the temporal immunohistochemical distribution of five representative components of NPCs-Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 (RanGap1), glycoprotein-210 (Gp210), nucleoporin 205 (Nup205), nucleoporin 107 (Nup107), and nucleoporin 50 (Nup50)-after 90min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) up to 28 days after the reperfusion in rat brains. Single immunohistochemical analyses showed ring-like stainings along the periphery of the nucleus in sham control brains. After tMCAO, Gp210 and Nup107 immunoreactivity continuously increased from 1 day, and RanGap1, Nup205, and Nup50 increased from 2 days until 28 days, which also displayed progressive precipitations within the nucleus in the peri-ischemic area, while the ischemic core showed scarce expression with collapsed structure. Double immunofluorescent analyses revealed nuclear retention and apparent colocalization of RanGap1 with Nup205, Gp210 with Nup205, and partial colocalization of Nup205 with Nup107; most of the ischemic changes above were similar to those observed in patients with C9orf72-genetic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Taken together, these observations suggest that the mislocalization of these nucleoporins may be a common pathogenesis of both ischemic and neurodegenerative disease.

KW - Cerebral ischemia

KW - Gp210

KW - Nup107

KW - Nup205

KW - Nup50

KW - RanGap1

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