Drop or fly? Negative genetic correlation between death-feigning intensity and flying ability as alternative anti-predator strategies

Tatsunori Ohno, Takahisa Miyatake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A prey animal may have the alternative of flying away or feigning death when it encounters predators. These alternatives have a genetic base as anti-predator strategies in the adzuki bean beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis. A negative genetic correlation between death-feigning intensity and flying ability was found in C. chinensis, i.e. lower flying ability is genetically connected to escaping by dropping from a perch and then feigning death, whereas higher flying ability does not correspond to death-feigning behaviour. Two bidirectional artificial selections for death-feigning duration and flying ability were conducted independently in C. chinensis. The strains selected for shorter (longer) duration of death-feigning had higher (lower) flying ability, while the strains selected for lower (higher) flying ability showed longer (shorter) duration of death-feigning. When the two traits were compared in 21 populations of C. chinensis derived from different geographical regions, a significant negative correlation was found between death-feigning intensity and flying ability. Based on these results, the choice between alternative escaping behaviours in animals is discussed from two points of view: phenotypic plasticity, an individual with two tactics; and pleiotropic genetic correlation, different individuals with opposite strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)555-560
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume274
Issue number1609
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 22 2007

Fingerprint

Tonic Immobility Response
Aptitude
Diptera
genetic correlation
Callosobruchus chinensis
Animals
flight
predator
death
Geographical regions
predators
Plasticity
animal
geographical region
phenotypic plasticity
beetle
duration
Perches
Animal Behavior
artificial selection

Keywords

  • Callosobruchus chinensis
  • Heritability
  • Selection experiment
  • Thanatosis
  • Tonic immobility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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title = "Drop or fly? Negative genetic correlation between death-feigning intensity and flying ability as alternative anti-predator strategies",
abstract = "A prey animal may have the alternative of flying away or feigning death when it encounters predators. These alternatives have a genetic base as anti-predator strategies in the adzuki bean beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis. A negative genetic correlation between death-feigning intensity and flying ability was found in C. chinensis, i.e. lower flying ability is genetically connected to escaping by dropping from a perch and then feigning death, whereas higher flying ability does not correspond to death-feigning behaviour. Two bidirectional artificial selections for death-feigning duration and flying ability were conducted independently in C. chinensis. The strains selected for shorter (longer) duration of death-feigning had higher (lower) flying ability, while the strains selected for lower (higher) flying ability showed longer (shorter) duration of death-feigning. When the two traits were compared in 21 populations of C. chinensis derived from different geographical regions, a significant negative correlation was found between death-feigning intensity and flying ability. Based on these results, the choice between alternative escaping behaviours in animals is discussed from two points of view: phenotypic plasticity, an individual with two tactics; and pleiotropic genetic correlation, different individuals with opposite strategies.",
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