Dose-Dependent Effects of Amino Acids on Clinical Outcomes in Adult Medical Inpatients Receiving Only Parenteral Nutrition: A Retrospective Cohort Study Using a Japanese Medical Claims Database

Kosei Takagi, Kenta Murotani, Satoru Kamoshita, Akiyoshi Kuroda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The majority of inpatients requiring parenteral nutrition (PN) do not receive adequate amino acid, which may negatively impact clinical outcomes. We investigated the influence of amino acid doses on clinical outcomes in medical adult inpatients fasting >10 days and receiving only PN, using Japanese medical claims database. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality, and the secondary endpoints included deterioration of activities of daily living (ADL), intravenous catheter infection, hospital readmission, hospital length of stay (LOS), and total medical costs. Patients were divided into four groups according to their mean prescribed daily amino acid doses from Days 4 to 10 of fasting: Adequate (≥0.8 g/kg/day), Moderate (≥0.6–<0.8 g/kg/day), Low (≥0.4–<0.6 g/kg/day), and Very low (<0.4 g/kg/day). Multivariate logistic or multiple regression analyses were performed with adjustments for patient characteristics (total n = 86,702). The Adequate group was used as the reference in all analyses. For the Moderate, Low, and Very low groups, adjusted ORs (95% CI) of in-hospital mortality were 1.20 (1.14–1.26), 1.43 (1.36–1.51), and 1.72 (1.62–1.82), respectively, and for deterioration of ADL were 1.21 (1.11–1.32), 1.34 (1.22–1.47), and 1.22 (1.09–1.37), respectively. Adjusted regression coefficients (95% CI) of hospital LOS were 1.2 (0.4–2.1), 1.5 (0.6–2.4), and 2.9 (1.8–4.1), respectively. Lower prescribed doses of amino acids were associated with worse clinical outcomes including higher in-hospital mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3541
JournalNutrients
Volume14
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2022

Keywords

  • amino acids
  • clinical outcomes
  • medical inpatient
  • parenteral nutrition
  • real-world data

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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