Does Temporal Expectation Driven by Rhythmic Cues Differ From That Driven by Symbolic Cues Across the Millisecond and Second Range?

Yanna Ren, Zhihan Xu, Fengxia Wu, Yoshimichi Ejima, Jiajia Yang, Satoshi Takahashi, Qiong Wu, Jinglong Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Temporal expectation relies on different predictive information, such as regular rhythms and symbolic cues, to direct attention to a future moment in time to optimize behaviour. However, whether differences exist between temporal expectations driven by regular rhythms and symbolic cues has not been clearly established. In this study, 20 participants performed two temporal expectation tasks in which a rhythmic cue or a symbolic cue indicated (70% expected) that the target would appear after an interval of 500 ms (short), 1,500 ms (medium), or 2,500 ms (long). We found larger cueing effects for the rhythmic cued task than for the symbolic cued task during the short interval, indicating that rhythmic cues were more effective in improving performance. Furthermore, no significant difference was found during the longer interval, reflect that the behavioural differences between the two forms of temporal expectations were likely to diminish as the time interval increased. Thus, we speculate that the temporal expectation driven by rhythmic cues differs from that driven by symbolic cues only in the limited time range; however, the mechanisms underlying the two forms of temporal expectations trend to become more similar over increasing temporal scales.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPerception
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

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Keywords

  • cueing effect
  • millisecond
  • rhythm
  • second
  • symbolic
  • temporal expectation
  • U-shaped curve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Artificial Intelligence

Cite this

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title = "Does Temporal Expectation Driven by Rhythmic Cues Differ From That Driven by Symbolic Cues Across the Millisecond and Second Range?",
abstract = "Temporal expectation relies on different predictive information, such as regular rhythms and symbolic cues, to direct attention to a future moment in time to optimize behaviour. However, whether differences exist between temporal expectations driven by regular rhythms and symbolic cues has not been clearly established. In this study, 20 participants performed two temporal expectation tasks in which a rhythmic cue or a symbolic cue indicated (70{\%} expected) that the target would appear after an interval of 500 ms (short), 1,500 ms (medium), or 2,500 ms (long). We found larger cueing effects for the rhythmic cued task than for the symbolic cued task during the short interval, indicating that rhythmic cues were more effective in improving performance. Furthermore, no significant difference was found during the longer interval, reflect that the behavioural differences between the two forms of temporal expectations were likely to diminish as the time interval increased. Thus, we speculate that the temporal expectation driven by rhythmic cues differs from that driven by symbolic cues only in the limited time range; however, the mechanisms underlying the two forms of temporal expectations trend to become more similar over increasing temporal scales.",
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AU - Xu, Zhihan

AU - Wu, Fengxia

AU - Ejima, Yoshimichi

AU - Yang, Jiajia

AU - Takahashi, Satoshi

AU - Wu, Qiong

AU - Wu, Jinglong

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N2 - Temporal expectation relies on different predictive information, such as regular rhythms and symbolic cues, to direct attention to a future moment in time to optimize behaviour. However, whether differences exist between temporal expectations driven by regular rhythms and symbolic cues has not been clearly established. In this study, 20 participants performed two temporal expectation tasks in which a rhythmic cue or a symbolic cue indicated (70% expected) that the target would appear after an interval of 500 ms (short), 1,500 ms (medium), or 2,500 ms (long). We found larger cueing effects for the rhythmic cued task than for the symbolic cued task during the short interval, indicating that rhythmic cues were more effective in improving performance. Furthermore, no significant difference was found during the longer interval, reflect that the behavioural differences between the two forms of temporal expectations were likely to diminish as the time interval increased. Thus, we speculate that the temporal expectation driven by rhythmic cues differs from that driven by symbolic cues only in the limited time range; however, the mechanisms underlying the two forms of temporal expectations trend to become more similar over increasing temporal scales.

AB - Temporal expectation relies on different predictive information, such as regular rhythms and symbolic cues, to direct attention to a future moment in time to optimize behaviour. However, whether differences exist between temporal expectations driven by regular rhythms and symbolic cues has not been clearly established. In this study, 20 participants performed two temporal expectation tasks in which a rhythmic cue or a symbolic cue indicated (70% expected) that the target would appear after an interval of 500 ms (short), 1,500 ms (medium), or 2,500 ms (long). We found larger cueing effects for the rhythmic cued task than for the symbolic cued task during the short interval, indicating that rhythmic cues were more effective in improving performance. Furthermore, no significant difference was found during the longer interval, reflect that the behavioural differences between the two forms of temporal expectations were likely to diminish as the time interval increased. Thus, we speculate that the temporal expectation driven by rhythmic cues differs from that driven by symbolic cues only in the limited time range; however, the mechanisms underlying the two forms of temporal expectations trend to become more similar over increasing temporal scales.

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