Does social capital promote physical activity? A population-based study in Japan

Kazumune Ueshima, Takeo Fujiwara, Soshi Takao, Etsuji Suzuki, Toshihide Iwase, Hiroyuki Doi, S. V. Subramanian, Ichiro Kawachi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To examine the association between individual-level social capital and physical activity. Methodology/Principal Findings: In February 2009, data were collected in a population-based cross-sectional survey in Okayama city, Japan. A cluster-sampling approach was used to randomly select 4,000 residents from 20 school districts. A total of 2260 questionnaires were returned (response rate: 57.4%). Individual-level social capital was assessed by an item inquiring about perceived trust of others in the community (cognitive dimension of social capital) categorized as low trust (43.0%), mid trust (38.6%), and high trust (17.3%), as well as participation in voluntary groups (structural dimension of social capital), which further distinguished between bonding (8.9%) and bridging (27.1%) social capital. Using logistic regression, we calculated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for physical inactivity associated with each domain of social capital. Multiple imputation method was employed for missing data. Among total participants, 68.8% were physically active and 28.9% were inactive. Higher trust was associated with a significantly lower odds of physical inactivity (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.42-0.79) compared with low trust. Both bridging and bonding social capital were marginally significantly associated with lower odds of physical inactivity (bridging, OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.62-1.00; bonding, OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.48-1.03) compared with lack of structural social capital. Conclusions/Significance: Low individual-level social capital, especially lower trust of others in the community, was associated with physical inactivity among Japanese adults.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12135
JournalPLoS One
Volume5
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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social capital
physical activity
Japan
Population
odds ratio
confidence interval
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Logistics
Sampling
Social Capital
cross-sectional studies
questionnaires
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Does social capital promote physical activity? A population-based study in Japan. / Ueshima, Kazumune; Fujiwara, Takeo; Takao, Soshi; Suzuki, Etsuji; Iwase, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki; Subramanian, S. V.; Kawachi, Ichiro.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 5, No. 8, e12135, 2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ueshima, Kazumune ; Fujiwara, Takeo ; Takao, Soshi ; Suzuki, Etsuji ; Iwase, Toshihide ; Doi, Hiroyuki ; Subramanian, S. V. ; Kawachi, Ichiro. / Does social capital promote physical activity? A population-based study in Japan. In: PLoS One. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 8.
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