Does late morning waking-up affect sleep during the following night in patients with primary insomnia?

Atsushi Ogawa, Shiro Hinotsu, Koji Kawakami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Night-to-night variability in sleep duration and schedule is common in patients with insomnia. Among the various sleep variables, waking-up time is focused upon as the important factor for cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia. This study examined the effect of a single late waking-up episode on sleep in the immediate following night in patients with chronic insomnia, using data from a placebo group (380 patients) of a double-blind placebo-controlled study. Patients tended to wake up later and have a longer total sleep time on weekends than weekdays. It was suggested that patients who woke up late one morning (later than the individuals regular waking-up time) extended their sleep onset latency by 4.3 min in the immediate following night. The effects of late waking-up on total sleep time and bedtime were not clear. The importance of keeping regular waking-up time is highlighted for better sleep in patients with insomnia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)938-948
Number of pages11
JournalBiological Rhythm Research
Volume44
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

sleep
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Sleep
placebos
Placebos
Cognitive Therapy
sleep disorders
Appointments and Schedules
therapeutics
duration

Keywords

  • insomnia
  • irregular sleep
  • sleep onset latency
  • waking-up time
  • weekend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Does late morning waking-up affect sleep during the following night in patients with primary insomnia? / Ogawa, Atsushi; Hinotsu, Shiro; Kawakami, Koji.

In: Biological Rhythm Research, Vol. 44, No. 6, 01.12.2013, p. 938-948.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ogawa, Atsushi ; Hinotsu, Shiro ; Kawakami, Koji. / Does late morning waking-up affect sleep during the following night in patients with primary insomnia?. In: Biological Rhythm Research. 2013 ; Vol. 44, No. 6. pp. 938-948.
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