Distribution of periodontopathic bacterial species in Japanese children with developmental disabilities

Shuhei Naka, Aki Yamana, Kazuhiko Nakano, Rena Okawa, Kazuyo Fujita, Ayuchi Kojima, Hirotoshi Nemoto, Ryota Nomura, Michiyo Nakano, Takashi Ooshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background. Recent developments in molecular biological techniques have enabled rapid detection of periodontopathic bacterial species in clinical specimens. Accumulated evidence suggests that detection of specific bacterial species enables identification of subjects at high risk for the onset of periodontitis. We investigated the distribution of 10 selected periodontopathic bacterial species in dental plaque specimens obtained from children with disabilities who were attending daycare centers. Methods. A total of 187 children (136 boys, 51 girls) aged 1-6 years old and diagnosed with such disabilities as mental retardation, cerebral palsy, and autism, participated in the study. Subgingival dental plaque specimens were collected from the buccal side of the maxillary left second primary molar after a clinical examination. Bacterial DNA was extracted from the specimens and PCR analyses were carried out to detect 10 selected periodontopathic species using specific primers for each. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to analyze the correlations among clinical parameters and the detected species. Results. The most frequently detected species was Capnocytophaga sputigena (28.3%), followed by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (20.9%) and Campylobacter rectus (18.2%). Eikenella corrodens, Capnocytophaga ochracea, and Prevotella nigrescence were detected in approximately 10% of the specimens, whereas Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia were rarely found, and Porphyromonas gingivalis was not detected in any of the subjects. The total numbers of detected species were positively correlated with the age of the subjects. There were 10 subjects with positive reactions for T. denticola and/or T. forsythia, in whom the total number of bacterial species was significantly higher as compared to the other subjects. Furthermore, subjects possessing C. rectus showed significantly greater values for periodontal pocket depth, gingival index, and total number of species. Conclusion. We found that approximately one-fourth of the present subjects with disabilities who possessed at least one of T. denticola, T. forsythia, and C. rectus were at possible risk for periodontitis. Follow-up examinations as well as preventive approaches should be utilized for such individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Article number24
JournalBMC Oral Health
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Campylobacter rectus
Treponema denticola
Developmental Disabilities
Disabled Children
Capnocytophaga
Dental Plaque
Periodontitis
Eikenella corrodens
Prevotella intermedia
Prevotella
Periodontal Pocket
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans
Periodontal Index
Bacterial DNA
Porphyromonas gingivalis
Cheek
Cerebral Palsy
Autistic Disorder
Intellectual Disability
Polymerase Chain Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Distribution of periodontopathic bacterial species in Japanese children with developmental disabilities. / Naka, Shuhei; Yamana, Aki; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Okawa, Rena; Fujita, Kazuyo; Kojima, Ayuchi; Nemoto, Hirotoshi; Nomura, Ryota; Nakano, Michiyo; Ooshima, Takashi.

In: BMC Oral Health, Vol. 9, No. 1, 24, 2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Naka, S, Yamana, A, Nakano, K, Okawa, R, Fujita, K, Kojima, A, Nemoto, H, Nomura, R, Nakano, M & Ooshima, T 2009, 'Distribution of periodontopathic bacterial species in Japanese children with developmental disabilities', BMC Oral Health, vol. 9, no. 1, 24. https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6831-9-24
Naka, Shuhei ; Yamana, Aki ; Nakano, Kazuhiko ; Okawa, Rena ; Fujita, Kazuyo ; Kojima, Ayuchi ; Nemoto, Hirotoshi ; Nomura, Ryota ; Nakano, Michiyo ; Ooshima, Takashi. / Distribution of periodontopathic bacterial species in Japanese children with developmental disabilities. In: BMC Oral Health. 2009 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background. Recent developments in molecular biological techniques have enabled rapid detection of periodontopathic bacterial species in clinical specimens. Accumulated evidence suggests that detection of specific bacterial species enables identification of subjects at high risk for the onset of periodontitis. We investigated the distribution of 10 selected periodontopathic bacterial species in dental plaque specimens obtained from children with disabilities who were attending daycare centers. Methods. A total of 187 children (136 boys, 51 girls) aged 1-6 years old and diagnosed with such disabilities as mental retardation, cerebral palsy, and autism, participated in the study. Subgingival dental plaque specimens were collected from the buccal side of the maxillary left second primary molar after a clinical examination. Bacterial DNA was extracted from the specimens and PCR analyses were carried out to detect 10 selected periodontopathic species using specific primers for each. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to analyze the correlations among clinical parameters and the detected species. Results. The most frequently detected species was Capnocytophaga sputigena (28.3{\%}), followed by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (20.9{\%}) and Campylobacter rectus (18.2{\%}). Eikenella corrodens, Capnocytophaga ochracea, and Prevotella nigrescence were detected in approximately 10{\%} of the specimens, whereas Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia were rarely found, and Porphyromonas gingivalis was not detected in any of the subjects. The total numbers of detected species were positively correlated with the age of the subjects. There were 10 subjects with positive reactions for T. denticola and/or T. forsythia, in whom the total number of bacterial species was significantly higher as compared to the other subjects. Furthermore, subjects possessing C. rectus showed significantly greater values for periodontal pocket depth, gingival index, and total number of species. Conclusion. We found that approximately one-fourth of the present subjects with disabilities who possessed at least one of T. denticola, T. forsythia, and C. rectus were at possible risk for periodontitis. Follow-up examinations as well as preventive approaches should be utilized for such individuals.",
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AU - Yamana, Aki

AU - Nakano, Kazuhiko

AU - Okawa, Rena

AU - Fujita, Kazuyo

AU - Kojima, Ayuchi

AU - Nemoto, Hirotoshi

AU - Nomura, Ryota

AU - Nakano, Michiyo

AU - Ooshima, Takashi

PY - 2009

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N2 - Background. Recent developments in molecular biological techniques have enabled rapid detection of periodontopathic bacterial species in clinical specimens. Accumulated evidence suggests that detection of specific bacterial species enables identification of subjects at high risk for the onset of periodontitis. We investigated the distribution of 10 selected periodontopathic bacterial species in dental plaque specimens obtained from children with disabilities who were attending daycare centers. Methods. A total of 187 children (136 boys, 51 girls) aged 1-6 years old and diagnosed with such disabilities as mental retardation, cerebral palsy, and autism, participated in the study. Subgingival dental plaque specimens were collected from the buccal side of the maxillary left second primary molar after a clinical examination. Bacterial DNA was extracted from the specimens and PCR analyses were carried out to detect 10 selected periodontopathic species using specific primers for each. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to analyze the correlations among clinical parameters and the detected species. Results. The most frequently detected species was Capnocytophaga sputigena (28.3%), followed by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (20.9%) and Campylobacter rectus (18.2%). Eikenella corrodens, Capnocytophaga ochracea, and Prevotella nigrescence were detected in approximately 10% of the specimens, whereas Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia were rarely found, and Porphyromonas gingivalis was not detected in any of the subjects. The total numbers of detected species were positively correlated with the age of the subjects. There were 10 subjects with positive reactions for T. denticola and/or T. forsythia, in whom the total number of bacterial species was significantly higher as compared to the other subjects. Furthermore, subjects possessing C. rectus showed significantly greater values for periodontal pocket depth, gingival index, and total number of species. Conclusion. We found that approximately one-fourth of the present subjects with disabilities who possessed at least one of T. denticola, T. forsythia, and C. rectus were at possible risk for periodontitis. Follow-up examinations as well as preventive approaches should be utilized for such individuals.

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