Distribution of 10 periodontal bacteria in saliva samples from Japanese children and their mothers

Kiyoko Tamura, Kazuhiko Nakano, Tetsuyuki Hayashibara, Ryota Nomura, Kazuyo Fujita, Seikou Shintani, Takashi Ooshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We analyzed the distribution of 10 periodontal bacteria species (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, Campylobacter rectus, Eikenella corrodens, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga ochracea, Capnocytophaga sputigena, and Treponema denticola) in children, and then compared their distribution in those children and their mothers, with special attention given to three of the species known as the red complex (P. gingivalis, T. forsythensis, and T. denticola) whose presence has been shown to be associated with conditions related to periodontal diseases. Methods: One hundred thirteen pairs of children and their mothers were randomly selected from patients treated at the Pedodontic Clinic of Osaka University Dental Hospital. Saliva samples were taken at the second visit prior to receiving professional tooth brushing instruction. Genomic DNA was extracted from each saliva sample, followed by a polymerase chain reaction assay with species-specific sets of primers. Results: A. actinomycetemcomitans was the most frequently detected species in the mothers, followed by C. sputigena, P. gingivalis, and T. forsythensis, while C. sputigena had the highest detection rate, followed by A. actinomycetemcomitans and T. denticola in the children. The detection rate of the red complex species in children whose mothers possessed the same species was significantly higher than in those whose mothers did not possess them. Conclusions: Our results indicate a correlation between the presence of periodontal bacteria in children and their mothers, while the presence of red complex bacteria in children was highly associated with that in their mothers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-377
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Oral Biology
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Saliva
Mothers
Bacteria
Treponema denticola
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans
Porphyromonas gingivalis
Capnocytophaga
Campylobacter rectus
Tooth
Prevotella nigrescens
Eikenella corrodens
Prevotella intermedia
Pediatric Dentistry
Periodontal Diseases
Polymerase Chain Reaction
DNA

Keywords

  • Children
  • Mothers
  • PCR
  • Periodontal bacteria
  • Red complex
  • Transmission

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Tamura, K., Nakano, K., Hayashibara, T., Nomura, R., Fujita, K., Shintani, S., & Ooshima, T. (2006). Distribution of 10 periodontal bacteria in saliva samples from Japanese children and their mothers. Archives of Oral Biology, 51(5), 371-377. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.archoralbio.2005.09.008

Distribution of 10 periodontal bacteria in saliva samples from Japanese children and their mothers. / Tamura, Kiyoko; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Hayashibara, Tetsuyuki; Nomura, Ryota; Fujita, Kazuyo; Shintani, Seikou; Ooshima, Takashi.

In: Archives of Oral Biology, Vol. 51, No. 5, 05.2006, p. 371-377.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tamura, K, Nakano, K, Hayashibara, T, Nomura, R, Fujita, K, Shintani, S & Ooshima, T 2006, 'Distribution of 10 periodontal bacteria in saliva samples from Japanese children and their mothers', Archives of Oral Biology, vol. 51, no. 5, pp. 371-377. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.archoralbio.2005.09.008
Tamura, Kiyoko ; Nakano, Kazuhiko ; Hayashibara, Tetsuyuki ; Nomura, Ryota ; Fujita, Kazuyo ; Shintani, Seikou ; Ooshima, Takashi. / Distribution of 10 periodontal bacteria in saliva samples from Japanese children and their mothers. In: Archives of Oral Biology. 2006 ; Vol. 51, No. 5. pp. 371-377.
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