Disease and injury trends among evacuees in a shelter located at the epicenter of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes, Japan

Takashi Yorifuji, Takushi Sato, Toru Yoneda, Yoshiomi Kishida, Sumie Yamamoto, Taro Sakai, Hiroshi Sashiyama, Shuko Takahashi, Hayato Orui, Daisuke Kato, Taro Hasegawa, Yoshihiro Suzuki, Maki Okamoto, Hideki Hayashi, Shigeru Suganami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two huge earthquakes struck Kumamoto, Japan, in April 2016, forcing residents to evacuate. Few studies have reported early-phase disease and injury trends among evacuees following major inland earthquakes. We evaluated the trends among evacuees who visited a medical clinic in a shelter located at the epicenter of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes. The clinic opened on April 15, the day after the foreshock, and closed 3 weeks later. We reviewed medical charts related to 929 outpatient visits and conducted descriptive analyses. The evacuees experienced mild injuries and common diseases. The types of diseases changed weekly. Elderly people needed medical support for longer than other age groups. Future earthquakes may be inevitable, but establishing arrangements for medical needs or making precautions for infectious diseases in shelters could reduce the effects of earthquake-related health problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Environmental and Occupational Health
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jul 18 2017

Fingerprint

Earthquakes
earthquake epicenter
shelter
Japan
earthquake
Wounds and Injuries
foreshock
infectious disease
Medical problems
Communicable Diseases
Outpatients
Age Groups
trend
Health

Keywords

  • Common disease
  • communicable disease control
  • disaster
  • earthquake
  • epidemiology
  • injury
  • Kumamoto

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Disease and injury trends among evacuees in a shelter located at the epicenter of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes, Japan. / Yorifuji, Takashi; Sato, Takushi; Yoneda, Toru; Kishida, Yoshiomi; Yamamoto, Sumie; Sakai, Taro; Sashiyama, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Shuko; Orui, Hayato; Kato, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Taro; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Okamoto, Maki; Hayashi, Hideki; Suganami, Shigeru.

In: Archives of Environmental and Occupational Health, 18.07.2017, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yorifuji, T, Sato, T, Yoneda, T, Kishida, Y, Yamamoto, S, Sakai, T, Sashiyama, H, Takahashi, S, Orui, H, Kato, D, Hasegawa, T, Suzuki, Y, Okamoto, M, Hayashi, H & Suganami, S 2017, 'Disease and injury trends among evacuees in a shelter located at the epicenter of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes, Japan', Archives of Environmental and Occupational Health, pp. 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1080/19338244.2017.1343238
Yorifuji, Takashi ; Sato, Takushi ; Yoneda, Toru ; Kishida, Yoshiomi ; Yamamoto, Sumie ; Sakai, Taro ; Sashiyama, Hiroshi ; Takahashi, Shuko ; Orui, Hayato ; Kato, Daisuke ; Hasegawa, Taro ; Suzuki, Yoshihiro ; Okamoto, Maki ; Hayashi, Hideki ; Suganami, Shigeru. / Disease and injury trends among evacuees in a shelter located at the epicenter of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes, Japan. In: Archives of Environmental and Occupational Health. 2017 ; pp. 1-8.
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