Direct thrombosis of aneurysms with cellulose acetate polymer. Part II: Preliminary clinical experience

K. Kinugasa, S. Mandai, Y. Terai, I. Kamata, Kenji Sugiu, T. Ohmoto, A. Nishimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors report the treatment of seven intracranial aneurysms in six patients with direct infusion of cellulose acetate polymer solution, a new liquid thrombotic material. These aneurysms were considered inoperable because of their size or location, or because of the patient's neurological condition. This material avoids the difficulties associated with balloon occlusion, and completely fills even irregularly shaped aneurysms. Cellulose acetate polymer solution hardens in about 5 minutes and remains solid once inside the aneurysm. Because this technique is less invasive than surgery, it can be used for high-risk patients in the acute stage of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Transient motor aphasia occurred in one patient. A small residual neck, which caused rebleeding 3 months after the treatment, remained in another patient. This article describes the new material, the procedure for direct thrombosis, and preliminary clinical results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)501-507
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume77
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Aneurysm
Polymers
Thrombosis
Broca Aphasia
Balloon Occlusion
Intracranial Aneurysm
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Neck
acetylcellulose
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • aneurysm
  • cellulose acetate polymer
  • endovascular technique
  • interventional neuroradiology
  • thrombotic material

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Kinugasa, K., Mandai, S., Terai, Y., Kamata, I., Sugiu, K., Ohmoto, T., & Nishimoto, A. (1992). Direct thrombosis of aneurysms with cellulose acetate polymer. Part II: Preliminary clinical experience. Journal of Neurosurgery, 77(4), 501-507.

Direct thrombosis of aneurysms with cellulose acetate polymer. Part II : Preliminary clinical experience. / Kinugasa, K.; Mandai, S.; Terai, Y.; Kamata, I.; Sugiu, Kenji; Ohmoto, T.; Nishimoto, A.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 77, No. 4, 1992, p. 501-507.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kinugasa, K, Mandai, S, Terai, Y, Kamata, I, Sugiu, K, Ohmoto, T & Nishimoto, A 1992, 'Direct thrombosis of aneurysms with cellulose acetate polymer. Part II: Preliminary clinical experience', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 77, no. 4, pp. 501-507.
Kinugasa, K. ; Mandai, S. ; Terai, Y. ; Kamata, I. ; Sugiu, Kenji ; Ohmoto, T. ; Nishimoto, A. / Direct thrombosis of aneurysms with cellulose acetate polymer. Part II : Preliminary clinical experience. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1992 ; Vol. 77, No. 4. pp. 501-507.
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