Differential diagnosis of nonepileptic twilight state with convulsive manifestations after febrile seizures

Hiroyuki Miyahara, Tomoyuki Akiyama, Kenji Waki, Yoshio Arakaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Nonepileptic twilight state with convulsive manifestations (NETC) is a nonepileptic state following a febrile seizure (FS), which may be misdiagnosed as a prolonged seizure and result in overtreatment. We aimed to describe clinical manifestations of NETC and to determine characteristics that are helpful to distinguish NETC from other pathological conditions. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review from January 2010 to December 2016 and selected the patients who presented with symptoms resembling status epilepticus with fever and a confirmed diagnosis using an electroencephalogram (EEG). We compared the NETC clinical features and venous blood gas analysis results with those of other conditions that mimic NETC. We also compared the characteristics of NETC with past reports. Results: Our NETC patients presented with short durations of the preceding generalized convulsions followed by tonic posturing, closed eyes, no cyanosis, responsiveness to painful stimulation, and no accumulation of CO2 in the venous blood gas. Most of these characteristics were consistent with past reports. Prolonged FS or acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) showed several of these features, but all the characteristics were not consistent with our study. Conclusions: Prolonged FS and AESD need to be differentiated from NETC, and close clinical observation makes it possible to partially distinguish NETC from the other conditions. EEG is recommended for patients with symptoms that are inconsistent with these features.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBrain and Development
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Febrile Seizures
Seizures
Differential Diagnosis
Electroencephalography
Blood Gas Analysis
Cyanosis
Status Epilepticus
Brain Diseases
Diagnostic Errors
Fever
Gases
Observation

Keywords

  • Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion
  • Clinical characteristics
  • Electroencephalogram
  • Prolonged febrile seizure
  • Venous blood gas
  • Venous blood gas analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Differential diagnosis of nonepileptic twilight state with convulsive manifestations after febrile seizures. / Miyahara, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Waki, Kenji; Arakaki, Yoshio.

In: Brain and Development, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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