Differences in attack avoidance and mating success between strains artificially selected for dispersal distance in Tribolium castaneum

Kentarou Matsumura, Takahisa Miyatake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Individuals of both dispersal and non-dispersal types (disperser and non-disperser) are found in a population, suggesting that each type has both costs and benefits for fitness. However, few studies have examined the trade-off between the costs and benefits for the types. Here, we artificially selected for walking distance, i.e., an indicator of dispersal ability, in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and established strains with longer (L-strains) or shorter (S-strains) walking distances. We then compared the frequency of predation by the assassin bug Amphibolus venator and the mating frequency of the selected strains. L-strain beetles suffered higher predation risk, than did S-strain beetles. L-strain males had significantly increased mating success compared to S-strain males, but females did not show a significant difference between the strains. The current results showed the existence of a trade-off between predation avoidance and mating success associated with dispersal types at a genetic level only in males. This finding can help to explain the maintenance of variation in dispersal ability within a population.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0127042
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 13 2015

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Tribolium
Tribolium castaneum
Beetles
Walking
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Reduviidae
Flour
Population
Maintenance
predation
walking
Coleoptera
mating frequency
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Differences in attack avoidance and mating success between strains artificially selected for dispersal distance in Tribolium castaneum. / Matsumura, Kentarou; Miyatake, Takahisa.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 5, e0127042, 13.05.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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