Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiography Using a Short-Type Double-Balloon Endoscope in Patients with Altered Gastrointestinal Anatomy: A Multicenter Prospective Study in Japan

Japanese DB-ERC Study Group

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42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:To evaluate the utility and safety of a short-type double-balloon endoscope (DBE) in the treatment of biliary disease in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal (GI) anatomy.METHODS:This study was conducted as a multicenter, single-arm, prospective trial at five tertiary academic care centers and three community-based hospitals in Japan. Consecutive patients with biliary disease with altered GI anatomy were prospectively included in this study.RESULTS:A total of 311 patients underwent double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). The success rate of reaching the target site, the primary end point, was 97.7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 95.4-99.1). The success rate of biliary cannulation and contrast injection of the targeted duct, the secondary end point, was 96.4% (95% CI: 93.6-98.2), and the therapeutic success rate was 97.9% (95% CI: 95.4-99.2). Adverse events occurred in 33 patients (10.6%, 95% CI: 7.1-14.0) and were managed conservatively in all patients with the exception of 1 in whom a perforation developed, requiring emergency surgery.CONCLUSIONS:ERC using a short-type DBE resulted in an excellent therapeutic success rate and a low rate of adverse events. This treatment can be a first-line treatment for biliary disease in patients with surgically altered GI anatomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1750-1758
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume111
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2016

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Cholangiography
Endoscopes
Multicenter Studies
Anatomy
Japan
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals
Therapeutics
Community Hospital
Tertiary Care Centers
Catheterization
Emergencies
Safety
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

@article{95d8b537484b4acca1e193dbee516e49,
title = "Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiography Using a Short-Type Double-Balloon Endoscope in Patients with Altered Gastrointestinal Anatomy: A Multicenter Prospective Study in Japan",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES:To evaluate the utility and safety of a short-type double-balloon endoscope (DBE) in the treatment of biliary disease in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal (GI) anatomy.METHODS:This study was conducted as a multicenter, single-arm, prospective trial at five tertiary academic care centers and three community-based hospitals in Japan. Consecutive patients with biliary disease with altered GI anatomy were prospectively included in this study.RESULTS:A total of 311 patients underwent double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). The success rate of reaching the target site, the primary end point, was 97.7{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 95.4-99.1). The success rate of biliary cannulation and contrast injection of the targeted duct, the secondary end point, was 96.4{\%} (95{\%} CI: 93.6-98.2), and the therapeutic success rate was 97.9{\%} (95{\%} CI: 95.4-99.2). Adverse events occurred in 33 patients (10.6{\%}, 95{\%} CI: 7.1-14.0) and were managed conservatively in all patients with the exception of 1 in whom a perforation developed, requiring emergency surgery.CONCLUSIONS:ERC using a short-type DBE resulted in an excellent therapeutic success rate and a low rate of adverse events. This treatment can be a first-line treatment for biliary disease in patients with surgically altered GI anatomy.",
author = "{Japanese DB-ERC Study Group} and Masaaki Shimatani and Hisashi Hatanaka and Hirofumi Kogure and Koichiro Tsutsumi and Hiroki Kawashima and Keiji Hanada and Tomoki Matsuda and Tomoki Fujita and Makoto Takaoka and Tomonori Yano and Atsuo Yamada and Hironari Kato and Kazuichi Okazaki and Hironori Yamamoto and Hideki Ishikawa and Kentaro Sugano and Tsukasa Ikeura and Hiroyuki Isayama and Shinichi Katsuki and Hideaki Miyoshi and Masanao Nakamura and Hiroyuki Okada",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/ajg.2016.420",
language = "English",
volume = "111",
pages = "1750--1758",
journal = "American Journal of Gastroenterology",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiography Using a Short-Type Double-Balloon Endoscope in Patients with Altered Gastrointestinal Anatomy

T2 - A Multicenter Prospective Study in Japan

AU - Japanese DB-ERC Study Group

AU - Shimatani, Masaaki

AU - Hatanaka, Hisashi

AU - Kogure, Hirofumi

AU - Tsutsumi, Koichiro

AU - Kawashima, Hiroki

AU - Hanada, Keiji

AU - Matsuda, Tomoki

AU - Fujita, Tomoki

AU - Takaoka, Makoto

AU - Yano, Tomonori

AU - Yamada, Atsuo

AU - Kato, Hironari

AU - Okazaki, Kazuichi

AU - Yamamoto, Hironori

AU - Ishikawa, Hideki

AU - Sugano, Kentaro

AU - Ikeura, Tsukasa

AU - Isayama, Hiroyuki

AU - Katsuki, Shinichi

AU - Miyoshi, Hideaki

AU - Nakamura, Masanao

AU - Okada, Hiroyuki

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES:To evaluate the utility and safety of a short-type double-balloon endoscope (DBE) in the treatment of biliary disease in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal (GI) anatomy.METHODS:This study was conducted as a multicenter, single-arm, prospective trial at five tertiary academic care centers and three community-based hospitals in Japan. Consecutive patients with biliary disease with altered GI anatomy were prospectively included in this study.RESULTS:A total of 311 patients underwent double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). The success rate of reaching the target site, the primary end point, was 97.7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 95.4-99.1). The success rate of biliary cannulation and contrast injection of the targeted duct, the secondary end point, was 96.4% (95% CI: 93.6-98.2), and the therapeutic success rate was 97.9% (95% CI: 95.4-99.2). Adverse events occurred in 33 patients (10.6%, 95% CI: 7.1-14.0) and were managed conservatively in all patients with the exception of 1 in whom a perforation developed, requiring emergency surgery.CONCLUSIONS:ERC using a short-type DBE resulted in an excellent therapeutic success rate and a low rate of adverse events. This treatment can be a first-line treatment for biliary disease in patients with surgically altered GI anatomy.

AB - OBJECTIVES:To evaluate the utility and safety of a short-type double-balloon endoscope (DBE) in the treatment of biliary disease in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal (GI) anatomy.METHODS:This study was conducted as a multicenter, single-arm, prospective trial at five tertiary academic care centers and three community-based hospitals in Japan. Consecutive patients with biliary disease with altered GI anatomy were prospectively included in this study.RESULTS:A total of 311 patients underwent double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). The success rate of reaching the target site, the primary end point, was 97.7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 95.4-99.1). The success rate of biliary cannulation and contrast injection of the targeted duct, the secondary end point, was 96.4% (95% CI: 93.6-98.2), and the therapeutic success rate was 97.9% (95% CI: 95.4-99.2). Adverse events occurred in 33 patients (10.6%, 95% CI: 7.1-14.0) and were managed conservatively in all patients with the exception of 1 in whom a perforation developed, requiring emergency surgery.CONCLUSIONS:ERC using a short-type DBE resulted in an excellent therapeutic success rate and a low rate of adverse events. This treatment can be a first-line treatment for biliary disease in patients with surgically altered GI anatomy.

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JO - American Journal of Gastroenterology

JF - American Journal of Gastroenterology

SN - 0002-9270

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