Diabetes mellitus is associated with insufficient microvascular reperfusion following revascularization for anterior acute myocardial infarction

Satoshi Kurisu, Ichiro Inoue, Takuji Kawagoe, Masaharu Ishihara, Yuji Shimatani, Kenji Nishioka, Takashi Umemura, Suji Nakamura, Masashi Yoshida

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14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that lack of microvascular reperfusion following revascularization might be associated with a poor clinical outcome in diabetic patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods. We studied 134 patients with a first anterior AMI who underwent successful revascularization within 6 hours. We assessed microvascular reperfusion by using electrocardiogram recordings just before revascularization and on return to the coronary care unit. Lack of microvascular reperfusion was defined as the absence of decrease of ≥20% in the sum of ST segment elevation (ΣST). Results. Twenty-four patients had diabetes and 110 patients did not. ΣST before revascularization was similar between diabetic and nondiabetic patients. After revascularization, reduction of ΣST was significantly smaller (1.3±8.4 mm vs 6.5±10.8 mm, p=0.03), and lack of microvascular reperfusion was significantly more frequent (62.5% vs 33.6%, p=0.01) in diabetic patients. A multivariate analysis showed that diabetes was associated with insufficient microvascular reperfusion (odds ratio 3.18, p=0.03). Major adverse cardiac events occurred more frequently in patients with a lack of microvascular reperfusion (30.8% vs 15.9%, p=0.04). Conclusion. These findings suggest that lack of microvascular reperfusion following revascularization may be one of the mechanisms of a poor clinical outcome in diabetic patients with AMI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)554-559
Number of pages6
JournalInternal Medicine
Volume42
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Reperfusion
Diabetes Mellitus
Myocardial Infarction
Coronary Care Units
Electrocardiography
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio

Keywords

  • Microcirculation
  • Myocardial infarction
  • ST segment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Diabetes mellitus is associated with insufficient microvascular reperfusion following revascularization for anterior acute myocardial infarction. / Kurisu, Satoshi; Inoue, Ichiro; Kawagoe, Takuji; Ishihara, Masaharu; Shimatani, Yuji; Nishioka, Kenji; Umemura, Takashi; Nakamura, Suji; Yoshida, Masashi.

In: Internal Medicine, Vol. 42, No. 7, 01.07.2003, p. 554-559.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kurisu, S, Inoue, I, Kawagoe, T, Ishihara, M, Shimatani, Y, Nishioka, K, Umemura, T, Nakamura, S & Yoshida, M 2003, 'Diabetes mellitus is associated with insufficient microvascular reperfusion following revascularization for anterior acute myocardial infarction', Internal Medicine, vol. 42, no. 7, pp. 554-559.
Kurisu, Satoshi ; Inoue, Ichiro ; Kawagoe, Takuji ; Ishihara, Masaharu ; Shimatani, Yuji ; Nishioka, Kenji ; Umemura, Takashi ; Nakamura, Suji ; Yoshida, Masashi. / Diabetes mellitus is associated with insufficient microvascular reperfusion following revascularization for anterior acute myocardial infarction. In: Internal Medicine. 2003 ; Vol. 42, No. 7. pp. 554-559.
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