Developmental changes of glutamate dehydrogenase activity in rat liver mitochondria and its enhancement by branched-chain amino acids

Katsuto Eguchi, Masaru Yonezawa, Yukiteru Mitsui, Yuji Hiramatsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The developmental changes of glutamate dehydrogenase activity in the fetal and neonatal rat liver were investigated, as well as the effects of branched-chain amino acids on this enzyme. Hepatic glutamate dehydrogenase activity showed a marked increase at the end of the fetal period and peaked on the 5th day of neonate at approximately 3 times higher than the adult level. Glutamate dehydrogenase was activated by leucine, isoleucine, and valine in this order when they were added to isolated intact liver mitochondria in vitro. The enhancement of enzyme activity was more marked in fetal rats than in adults. In contrast, when branched-chain amino acids were added after disrupting the mitochondrial membrane by sonication, only leucine slightly activated glutamate dehydrogenase, while isoleucine and valine slightly inhibited its activity. Our findings suggest that glutamate may be actively synthesized in the developing rat liver mitochondria and then trans-aminated to other nonessential amino acids for protein synthesis, and that increased intramitochondrial branched-chain amino acid concentrations may enhance glutamate dehydrogenase activity. This anabolic metabolism will contribute to the fetal growth and development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-88
Number of pages6
JournalNeonatology
Volume62
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1992

Keywords

  • Branched-chain amino acids
  • Developing rat liver
  • Glutamate dehydrogenase
  • Mitochondria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Biology

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