Development and Evaluation of a Short-time Imaging Method for the Clinical Study of the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Subtraction Method

Kohei Sugimoto, Masahiro Kuroda, Yuuki Yoshimura, Kentaro Hamada, Abdullah Khasawneh, Majd Barham, Nouha Tekiki, Kohei Konishi, Hinata Ishizaka, Yudai Shimizu, Yuki Nakamitsu, Wlla E. Al-Hammad, Ryo Kamizaki, Susumu Kanazawa, Junichi Asaumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The apparent diffusion coefficient subtraction method (ASM) was developed as a new restricted diffusionweighted imaging technique for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The usefulness of the ASM has been established by in vitro basic research using a bio-phantom, and clinical research on the application of the ASM for the human body is needed. Herein, we developed a short-time sequence for ASM imaging of the heads of healthy volunteers (n=2), and we investigated the similarity between the obtained ASM images and diffusion kurtosis (DK) images to determine the utility of the ASM for clinical uses. This study appears to be the first to report ASM images of the human head. We observed that the short-time sequence for the ASM imaging of the head can be scanned in approx. 3 min at 1.5T MRI. The noise reduction effect of median filter processing was confirmed on the ASM images scanned by this sequence. The obtained ASM images showed a weak correlation with the DK images, indicating that the ASM images are restricted diffusion-weighted images. The new shorttime imaging sequence could thus be used in clinical studies applying the ASM

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-32
Number of pages8
JournalActa medica Okayama
Volume76
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Apparent diffusion coefficient
  • Apparent diffusion coefficient subtraction method
  • Diffusion kurtosis imaging
  • Restricted diffusion
  • Short-time imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Development and Evaluation of a Short-time Imaging Method for the Clinical Study of the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Subtraction Method'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this