Determination of total copper and free cupric ion in river waters originating from an old copper mine

Yukie Hayashi, Kiyoshi Takeda, Masakazu Kita, Kensuke Chikamori, Yasuhiro Imakura, Katsuo Murata, Shinsuke Yamashita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We attempted to distinguish the "free" cupric ion from the total copper in river waters originating from an old copper mine because the toxicity is generally attributed to the aquocomplexed free cupric ion. The total concentration of copper in the sample solutions was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry; the free cupric ion was analyzed with a copper ion-selective electrode. About 200 samples of river water around the copper mine were analyzed from November of 1993 to December of 1994. The concentration of free cupric ion at most stations is less than 1 ppm except for that near the H-8 point, where leaching water from the mine slag was led to a rock reservoir (30 cm in diameter and 1 m high) and the stored water overflowed from the reservoir. The leaching water stored in the reservoir had the highest concentration of the free cupric ion, averaging of 9.5 ppm. Fishes inhabit only the upper valley of the river and do not move into the lower valley. Fishes can not move to the downstream because of contaminating copper around the inner valley.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-162
Number of pages6
JournalBunseki Kagaku
Volume45
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Copper mines
Copper
Rivers
Ions
Water
Fish
Leaching
Atomic absorption spectrometry
Slags
Toxicity
Rocks

Keywords

  • Copper
  • Copper ion-selective electrode
  • Differentiation of free copper ion
  • Natural waters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Hayashi, Y., Takeda, K., Kita, M., Chikamori, K., Imakura, Y., Murata, K., & Yamashita, S. (1996). Determination of total copper and free cupric ion in river waters originating from an old copper mine. Bunseki Kagaku, 45(2), 157-162.

Determination of total copper and free cupric ion in river waters originating from an old copper mine. / Hayashi, Yukie; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Kita, Masakazu; Chikamori, Kensuke; Imakura, Yasuhiro; Murata, Katsuo; Yamashita, Shinsuke.

In: Bunseki Kagaku, Vol. 45, No. 2, 1996, p. 157-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hayashi, Y, Takeda, K, Kita, M, Chikamori, K, Imakura, Y, Murata, K & Yamashita, S 1996, 'Determination of total copper and free cupric ion in river waters originating from an old copper mine', Bunseki Kagaku, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 157-162.
Hayashi Y, Takeda K, Kita M, Chikamori K, Imakura Y, Murata K et al. Determination of total copper and free cupric ion in river waters originating from an old copper mine. Bunseki Kagaku. 1996;45(2):157-162.
Hayashi, Yukie ; Takeda, Kiyoshi ; Kita, Masakazu ; Chikamori, Kensuke ; Imakura, Yasuhiro ; Murata, Katsuo ; Yamashita, Shinsuke. / Determination of total copper and free cupric ion in river waters originating from an old copper mine. In: Bunseki Kagaku. 1996 ; Vol. 45, No. 2. pp. 157-162.
@article{42aabecf5ebb4358b4a747a8c016f7ec,
title = "Determination of total copper and free cupric ion in river waters originating from an old copper mine",
abstract = "We attempted to distinguish the {"}free{"} cupric ion from the total copper in river waters originating from an old copper mine because the toxicity is generally attributed to the aquocomplexed free cupric ion. The total concentration of copper in the sample solutions was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry; the free cupric ion was analyzed with a copper ion-selective electrode. About 200 samples of river water around the copper mine were analyzed from November of 1993 to December of 1994. The concentration of free cupric ion at most stations is less than 1 ppm except for that near the H-8 point, where leaching water from the mine slag was led to a rock reservoir (30 cm in diameter and 1 m high) and the stored water overflowed from the reservoir. The leaching water stored in the reservoir had the highest concentration of the free cupric ion, averaging of 9.5 ppm. Fishes inhabit only the upper valley of the river and do not move into the lower valley. Fishes can not move to the downstream because of contaminating copper around the inner valley.",
keywords = "Copper, Copper ion-selective electrode, Differentiation of free copper ion, Natural waters",
author = "Yukie Hayashi and Kiyoshi Takeda and Masakazu Kita and Kensuke Chikamori and Yasuhiro Imakura and Katsuo Murata and Shinsuke Yamashita",
year = "1996",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "157--162",
journal = "Bunseki Kagaku",
issn = "0525-1931",
publisher = "Japan Society for Analytical Chemistry",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Determination of total copper and free cupric ion in river waters originating from an old copper mine

AU - Hayashi, Yukie

AU - Takeda, Kiyoshi

AU - Kita, Masakazu

AU - Chikamori, Kensuke

AU - Imakura, Yasuhiro

AU - Murata, Katsuo

AU - Yamashita, Shinsuke

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - We attempted to distinguish the "free" cupric ion from the total copper in river waters originating from an old copper mine because the toxicity is generally attributed to the aquocomplexed free cupric ion. The total concentration of copper in the sample solutions was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry; the free cupric ion was analyzed with a copper ion-selective electrode. About 200 samples of river water around the copper mine were analyzed from November of 1993 to December of 1994. The concentration of free cupric ion at most stations is less than 1 ppm except for that near the H-8 point, where leaching water from the mine slag was led to a rock reservoir (30 cm in diameter and 1 m high) and the stored water overflowed from the reservoir. The leaching water stored in the reservoir had the highest concentration of the free cupric ion, averaging of 9.5 ppm. Fishes inhabit only the upper valley of the river and do not move into the lower valley. Fishes can not move to the downstream because of contaminating copper around the inner valley.

AB - We attempted to distinguish the "free" cupric ion from the total copper in river waters originating from an old copper mine because the toxicity is generally attributed to the aquocomplexed free cupric ion. The total concentration of copper in the sample solutions was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry; the free cupric ion was analyzed with a copper ion-selective electrode. About 200 samples of river water around the copper mine were analyzed from November of 1993 to December of 1994. The concentration of free cupric ion at most stations is less than 1 ppm except for that near the H-8 point, where leaching water from the mine slag was led to a rock reservoir (30 cm in diameter and 1 m high) and the stored water overflowed from the reservoir. The leaching water stored in the reservoir had the highest concentration of the free cupric ion, averaging of 9.5 ppm. Fishes inhabit only the upper valley of the river and do not move into the lower valley. Fishes can not move to the downstream because of contaminating copper around the inner valley.

KW - Copper

KW - Copper ion-selective electrode

KW - Differentiation of free copper ion

KW - Natural waters

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030532691&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030532691&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0030532691

VL - 45

SP - 157

EP - 162

JO - Bunseki Kagaku

JF - Bunseki Kagaku

SN - 0525-1931

IS - 2

ER -