Detection of the BLV provirus from nasal secretion and saliva samples using BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2: Comparison with blood samples from the same cattle

Yuan Yuan, Yuri Kitamura-Muramatsu, Susumu Saito, Hiroshi Ishizaki, Miwa Nakano, Satoshi Haga, Kazuhiro Matoba, Ayumu Ohno, Hironobu Murakami, Shin nosuke Takeshima, Yoko Aida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) induces enzootic bovine leukosis, which is the most common neoplastic disease in cattle. Sero-epidemiological studies show that BLV infection occurs worldwide. Direct contact between infected and uninfected cattle is thought to be one of the risk factors for BLV transmission. Contact transmission occurs via a mixture of natural sources, blood, and exudates. To confirm that BLV provirus is detectable in these samples, matched blood, nasal secretion, and saliva samples were collected from 50 cattle, and genomic DNA was extracted. BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2, an assay developed for the highly sensitive detection of BLV, was then used to measure the proviral load in blood (n=50), nasal secretions (n=48), and saliva (n=47) samples. The results showed that 35 blood samples, 14 nasal secretion samples, and 6 saliva samples were positive for the BLV provirus. Matched blood samples from cattle that were positive for the BLV provirus (either in nasal secretion or saliva samples) were also positive in their blood. The proviral load in the positive blood samples was >14,000 (copies/1×105 cells). Thus, even though the proviral load in the nasal secretion and saliva samples was much lower (<380 copies/1×105 cells) than that in the peripheral blood, prolonged direct contact between infected and healthy cattle may be considered as a risk factor for BLV transmission.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-254
Number of pages7
JournalVirus research
Volume210
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Blood
  • BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2
  • Nasal secretion
  • Proviral load
  • Saliva

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Cancer Research

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