Delftia acidovorans bacteremia caused by bacterial translocation after organophosphorus poisoning in an immunocompetent adult patient

Hideharu Hagiya, Tomoko Murase, Junichi Sugiyama, Yasutoshi Kuroe, Hiroyoshi Nojima, Hiromichi Naito, Shingo Hagioka, Naoki Morimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 46-year-old woman was transferred to our emergency unit because of impaired consciousness and respiratory failure with the history of excessive pesticide intake. The patient was hypersalivative and had bilateral pupillary miosis. Laboratory results showed markedly decreased cholinesterase. She was intubated and treated in the intensive care unit with the diagnosis of organophosphorus poisoning. The patient had persisted diarrhea, with a high fever and stomach tenderness on day 10. Whole-body contrast enhanced computed tomography revealed a swollen, enhanced small intestinal wall, and blood culture identified Delftia acidovorans. She was diagnosed as D. acidovorans bacteremia, probably caused by bacterial translocation based on the clinical presentation and the exclusion of other sources, and treated well with a total of 8 days of antibiotic therapy. So far as we know, this is the first case of D. acidovorans bacteremia that was presumably caused by bacterial translocation after organophosphorus poisoning in an immunocompetent adult patient.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)338-341
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infection and Chemotherapy
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Delftia acidovorans
Organophosphate Poisoning
Bacterial Translocation
Bacteremia
Miosis
Cholinesterases
Consciousness
Pesticides
Respiratory Insufficiency
Intensive Care Units
Hospital Emergency Service
Diarrhea
Stomach
Fever
History
Tomography
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Bacteremia
  • Bacterial translocation
  • Delftia acidovorans
  • Organophosphorus poisoning
  • Surface-active agent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Delftia acidovorans bacteremia caused by bacterial translocation after organophosphorus poisoning in an immunocompetent adult patient. / Hagiya, Hideharu; Murase, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Junichi; Kuroe, Yasutoshi; Nojima, Hiroyoshi; Naito, Hiromichi; Hagioka, Shingo; Morimoto, Naoki.

In: Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy, Vol. 19, No. 2, 04.2013, p. 338-341.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hagiya, Hideharu ; Murase, Tomoko ; Sugiyama, Junichi ; Kuroe, Yasutoshi ; Nojima, Hiroyoshi ; Naito, Hiromichi ; Hagioka, Shingo ; Morimoto, Naoki. / Delftia acidovorans bacteremia caused by bacterial translocation after organophosphorus poisoning in an immunocompetent adult patient. In: Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy. 2013 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 338-341.
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