Delayed activation of post-transcriptional gene silencing and de novo transgene methylation in plants with the coat protein gene of sweet potato feathery mottle potyvirus

Shoji Sonoda, Masamichi Nishiguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and DNA methylation was examined using Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with the coat protein gene including the 3' non-translated region of sweet potato feathery mottle potyvirus. Line 4.28 showed a delayed activation of the transgene silencing in comparison with the other silenced lines, and showed complete resistance against the recombinant potato virus X engineered to contain the sequence homologous to the transgene when the silencing was activated. The transgene methylation in line 4.28 was less extensive in comparison with those of the other silenced lines before the silencing was activated. However, the extent of methylation increased in the course of plant development and became comparable with those in the other silenced lines. The activated silencing and the increased transgene methylation were reset after meiosis. However, the characters of delayed activation of the silencing and developmentally increased transgene methylation were meiotically transmitted to the next generation. These results suggest that transgene(s) itself has a potential to trigger and reset DNA methylation, which could determine a state of PTGS. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-144
Number of pages8
JournalPlant Science
Volume156
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 28 2000

Keywords

  • DNA methylation
  • Gene silencing
  • Transgenic plants
  • Virus resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

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