Current experience and limitations of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for cardiac arrest in children: A single-center retrospective study

Kohei Tsukahara, Chiaki Toida, Takashi Muguruma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There are few reports detailing the importance of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for pediatric cardiac arrest in Japan. We investigated the status and issues surrounding extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) at our institution.Methods: Patients aged <15 years who underwent ECPR between April 1, 2003 and March 31, 2012 were eligible. The characteristics, cannulation site, durations of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), cannulation procedure, and ECMO, and neurologic outcomes were retrospectively reviewed. A favorable neurologic outcome was defined as Pediatric Cerebral Performance Categories 1 and 2.Results: A total of 21 ECPR events were identified. The median CPR and cannulation durations were 60 and 25 min, respectively. Central and peripheral access sites were employed in 15 and six cases, respectively. Five of the 21 patients (24%) were successfully weaned from ECMO and three of the 21 (14%) survived. Two of the three survivors had a favorable neurologic outcome.Conclusions: The mortality of patients undergoing ECPR at our institution was low. However, about 10% of all patients had a favorable neurologic outcome, which suggests that ECPR may be effective in pediatric cardiac arrest patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number68
JournalJournal of Intensive Care
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 31 2014

Keywords

  • Cardiac arrest
  • Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
  • Pediatric intensive care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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