Cross-cultural difference and cognitive biases as causes of gap of mindset toward safety between approach based on hazard detection and that based on firm safety confirmation

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Japanese or eastern countries’ attitude toward safety was reviewed from mindset toward safety, approach for addressing safety, and attitude toward investing for safety. This was compared with that of U.S. or western countries. It was assumed that such a difference leads to a major gap between the safety approach based on hazard detection and that based on firm safety confirmation. An attempt was made to explain why the gap arises from the standpoint of cross-cultural difference, cognitive biases, and the relationship between scarcity and slack. Based on the discussion, we demonstrated that we should recognize and accept cross-cultural difference, cognitive biases, and the risk of the state with less slack for safety due to scarcity (especially, economic one). The attitude toward safety in line with such properties should be modified to control the unacceptable risk to a minimum so that we can further enhance safety and cut off the vicious circle of repetition of similar disasters, collisions, or crashes.

LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Human Factors, Business Management and Society - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors, Business Management and Society, 2018
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages582-596
Number of pages15
ISBN (Print)9783319947082
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019
EventAHFE International Conference on Human Factors, Business Management and Society, 2018 - Orlando, United States
Duration: Jul 21 2018Jul 25 2018

Publication series

NameAdvances in Intelligent Systems and Computing
Volume783
ISSN (Print)2194-5357

Other

OtherAHFE International Conference on Human Factors, Business Management and Society, 2018
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando
Period7/21/187/25/18

Fingerprint

Hazards
Disasters
Economics

Keywords

  • Absolute safety
  • Acceptable risk
  • Attitude toward safety
  • Cognitive bias
  • Cross-cultural difference
  • Imbalance between safety and efficiency
  • Learn from failure
  • Safety myth
  • Scarcity and slack relation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Murata, A. (2019). Cross-cultural difference and cognitive biases as causes of gap of mindset toward safety between approach based on hazard detection and that based on firm safety confirmation. In Advances in Human Factors, Business Management and Society - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors, Business Management and Society, 2018 (pp. 582-596). (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing; Vol. 783). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-94709-9_57

Cross-cultural difference and cognitive biases as causes of gap of mindset toward safety between approach based on hazard detection and that based on firm safety confirmation. / Murata, Atsuo.

Advances in Human Factors, Business Management and Society - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors, Business Management and Society, 2018. Springer Verlag, 2019. p. 582-596 (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing; Vol. 783).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Murata, A 2019, Cross-cultural difference and cognitive biases as causes of gap of mindset toward safety between approach based on hazard detection and that based on firm safety confirmation. in Advances in Human Factors, Business Management and Society - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors, Business Management and Society, 2018. Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, vol. 783, Springer Verlag, pp. 582-596, AHFE International Conference on Human Factors, Business Management and Society, 2018, Orlando, United States, 7/21/18. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-94709-9_57
Murata A. Cross-cultural difference and cognitive biases as causes of gap of mindset toward safety between approach based on hazard detection and that based on firm safety confirmation. In Advances in Human Factors, Business Management and Society - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors, Business Management and Society, 2018. Springer Verlag. 2019. p. 582-596. (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-94709-9_57
Murata, Atsuo. / Cross-cultural difference and cognitive biases as causes of gap of mindset toward safety between approach based on hazard detection and that based on firm safety confirmation. Advances in Human Factors, Business Management and Society - Proceedings of the AHFE 2018 International Conference on Human Factors, Business Management and Society, 2018. Springer Verlag, 2019. pp. 582-596 (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing).
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