CO2 low-level laser therapy has an early but not delayed pain effect during experimental tooth movement

T. Deguchi, D. G. Kim, Hiroshi Kamioka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To test the hypothesis that the use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces elevated pain by controlling the release of neurochemicals during orthodontic tooth movement. Setting and Sample Population: Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Okayama University. Sixty-five Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to tooth movement and LLLT. Materials and Methods: Adult Sprague Dawley rats were used in this study. Groups included day 0 controls, irradiation only controls and with or without irradiation sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days after tooth movement (n=5 each, total n=65). Tooth movement was achieved by insertion of an elastic module between molar teeth. Immunohistochemistry for CD-11b, GFAP and c-fos in the brain stem was performed. Stains were quantified by constructing a three-dimensional image using IMARIS, and counted using NEURON TRACER and WinROOF software. Two-way ANOVA followed by a Tukey's post hoc test (P<.05) was used for statistical comparison between groups. Results: C-fos expression was significantly increased at one and three days after tooth movement. LLLT significantly diminished this increase in c-fos expression only at one day after tooth movement CD-b11 and GFAP expression also significantly increased after tooth movement. No significant change was observed for CD-11b and GFAP expression in the central nervous system upon LLLT. Conclusion: Low-level laser therapy may reduce early neurochemical markers but have no effect on delayed pain neurochemical markers after tooth movement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-176
Number of pages5
JournalOrthodontics and Craniofacial Research
Volume20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2017

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Tooth Movement Techniques
Pain
Sprague Dawley Rats
Three-Dimensional Imaging
Low-Level Light Therapy
Orthodontics
Brain Stem
Orthopedics
Analysis of Variance
Tooth
Coloring Agents
Software
Central Nervous System
Immunohistochemistry

Keywords

  • c-fos
  • glia
  • low-level laser
  • tooth movement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthodontics
  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

CO2 low-level laser therapy has an early but not delayed pain effect during experimental tooth movement. / Deguchi, T.; Kim, D. G.; Kamioka, Hiroshi.

In: Orthodontics and Craniofacial Research, Vol. 20, 01.06.2017, p. 172-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives: To test the hypothesis that the use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces elevated pain by controlling the release of neurochemicals during orthodontic tooth movement. Setting and Sample Population: Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Okayama University. Sixty-five Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to tooth movement and LLLT. Materials and Methods: Adult Sprague Dawley rats were used in this study. Groups included day 0 controls, irradiation only controls and with or without irradiation sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days after tooth movement (n=5 each, total n=65). Tooth movement was achieved by insertion of an elastic module between molar teeth. Immunohistochemistry for CD-11b, GFAP and c-fos in the brain stem was performed. Stains were quantified by constructing a three-dimensional image using IMARIS, and counted using NEURON TRACER and WinROOF software. Two-way ANOVA followed by a Tukey's post hoc test (P<.05) was used for statistical comparison between groups. Results: C-fos expression was significantly increased at one and three days after tooth movement. LLLT significantly diminished this increase in c-fos expression only at one day after tooth movement CD-b11 and GFAP expression also significantly increased after tooth movement. No significant change was observed for CD-11b and GFAP expression in the central nervous system upon LLLT. Conclusion: Low-level laser therapy may reduce early neurochemical markers but have no effect on delayed pain neurochemical markers after tooth movement.",
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