Correlation between Mean Arterial Pressure and Regional Cerebral Oxygen Saturation on Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

Yu Pan, Qingqing Song, Tomoyuki Kanazawa, Hiroshi Morimatsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Some pediatric cardiac patients might experience low regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2) during surgery. We investigated whether a pediatric patient’s mean arterial pressure (MAP) can affect the rSO2 value during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We retrospectively analyzed the cases of the pediatric patients who underwent cardiac surgery at our hospital (Jan. –Dec. 2019; n=141). At each MAP stage, we constructed line charts through the mean of the rSO2 values corresponding to each MAP and then calculated the correlation coefficients. We next divided the patients into age subgroups (neonates, infants, children) and into cyanotic congenital heart disease (CHD) and acyanotic CHD groups and analyzed these groups in the same way. The analyses of all 141 patients revealed that during CPB the rSO2 value increased with an increase in MAP (r=0.1626). There was a correlation between rSO2 and MAP in the children (r=0.2720) but not in the neonates (r=0.06626) or infants (r=0.05260). Cyanotic CHD or acyanotic CHD did not have a significant effect on the rSO2/MAP correlation. Our analysis demonstrated different patterns of a correlation between MAP and rSO2 in pediatric cardiac surgery patients, depending on age. MAP was positively correlated with rSO2 typically in children but not in neonate or infant patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)557-564
Number of pages8
JournalActa medica Okayama
Volume76
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Keywords

  • Cerebral oxygen saturation
  • Mean arterial pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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