Conversion of photosystem II dimer to monomers during photoinhibition is tightly coupled with decrease in oxygen-evolving activity in the diatom Chaetoceros gracilis

Ryo Nagao, Tatsuya Tomo, Rei Narikawa, Isao Enami, Masahiko Ikeuchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rapid turnover of photosystem II (PSII) in diatoms is thought to be at an exceptionally high rate compared with other oxyphototrophs; however, its molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we examined the photodamage and repair processes of PSII in the marine centric diatom Chaetoceros gracilis incubated at 30 or 300 μmol photons m−2 s−1 in the presence of a de novo protein-synthesis inhibitor. When de novo protein synthesis was blocked by chloramphenicol (Cm), oxygen-evolving activity gradually decreased even at 30 μmol photons m−2 s−1 and could not be detected at 12 h. PSII inactivation was enhanced by higher illumination. Using Cm-treated cells, the conversion of PSII dimer to monomers was observed by blue native PAGE. The rate of PSII monomerization was very similar to that of the decrease in oxygen-evolving activity under both light conditions. Immunological detection of D1 protein in the Cm-treated cells showed that the rate of D1 degradation was slower than that of the former two events, although it was more rapid than that observed in other oxyphototrophs. Thus, the three accelerated events, especially PSII monomerization, appear to cause the unusually high rate of PSII turnover in diatoms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-91
Number of pages9
JournalPhotosynthesis Research
Volume130
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chaetoceros gracilis
Diatoms
Photosystem II Protein Complex
Bacillariophyceae
photoinhibition
Dimers
photosystem II
Monomers
Oxygen
oxygen
Chloramphenicol
chloramphenicol
Photons
Cells
Native Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis
protein synthesis inhibitors
D1 protein
Protein Synthesis Inhibitors
Lighting
lighting

Keywords

  • D1 degradation
  • Diatom
  • Oxygen-evolving activity
  • Photodamage and repair
  • PSII monomerization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Conversion of photosystem II dimer to monomers during photoinhibition is tightly coupled with decrease in oxygen-evolving activity in the diatom Chaetoceros gracilis. / Nagao, Ryo; Tomo, Tatsuya; Narikawa, Rei; Enami, Isao; Ikeuchi, Masahiko.

In: Photosynthesis Research, Vol. 130, No. 1-3, 01.12.2016, p. 83-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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