Convergent loss of awn in two cultivated rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima is caused by mutations in different loci

Tomoyuki Furuta, Norio Komeda, Kenji Asano, Kanako Uehara, Rico Gamuyao, Rosalyn B. Angeles-Shim, Keisuke Nagai, Kazuyuki Doi, Diane R. Wang, Hideshi Yasui, Atsushi Yoshimura, Jianzhong Wu, Susan R. McCouch, Motoyuki Ashikari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A long awn is one of the distinct morphological features of wild rice species. This organ is thought to aid in seed dispersal and prevent predation by animals. Most cultivated varieties of Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima, however, have lost the ability to form long awns. The causal genetic factors responsible for the loss of awn in these two rice species remain largely unknown. Here, we evaluated three sets of chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) in a common O. sativa genetic background (cv. Koshihikari) that harbor genomic fragments from Oryza nivara, Oryza rufipogon, and Oryza glaberrima donors. Phenotypic analyses of these libraries revealed the existence of three genes, Regulator of Awn Elongation 1 (RAE1), RAE2, and RAE3, involved in the loss of long awns in cultivated rice. Donor segments at two of these genes, RAE1 and RAE2, induced long awn formation in the CSSLs whereas an O. sativa segment at RAE3 induced long awn formation in O. glaberrima. These results suggest that the two cultivated rice species, O. sativa and O. glaberrima, have taken independent paths to become awnless.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2267-2274
Number of pages8
JournalG3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics
Volume5
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mutation
Regulator Genes
Oryza
Chromosomes
Seed Dispersal
Libraries

Keywords

  • African rice
  • Asian rice
  • Awn
  • CSSLs
  • Domestication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Convergent loss of awn in two cultivated rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima is caused by mutations in different loci. / Furuta, Tomoyuki; Komeda, Norio; Asano, Kenji; Uehara, Kanako; Gamuyao, Rico; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn B.; Nagai, Keisuke; Doi, Kazuyuki; Wang, Diane R.; Yasui, Hideshi; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Wu, Jianzhong; McCouch, Susan R.; Ashikari, Motoyuki.

In: G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, Vol. 5, No. 11, 01.01.2015, p. 2267-2274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Furuta, T, Komeda, N, Asano, K, Uehara, K, Gamuyao, R, Angeles-Shim, RB, Nagai, K, Doi, K, Wang, DR, Yasui, H, Yoshimura, A, Wu, J, McCouch, SR & Ashikari, M 2015, 'Convergent loss of awn in two cultivated rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima is caused by mutations in different loci', G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, vol. 5, no. 11, pp. 2267-2274. https://doi.org/10.1534/g3.115.020834
Furuta, Tomoyuki ; Komeda, Norio ; Asano, Kenji ; Uehara, Kanako ; Gamuyao, Rico ; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn B. ; Nagai, Keisuke ; Doi, Kazuyuki ; Wang, Diane R. ; Yasui, Hideshi ; Yoshimura, Atsushi ; Wu, Jianzhong ; McCouch, Susan R. ; Ashikari, Motoyuki. / Convergent loss of awn in two cultivated rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima is caused by mutations in different loci. In: G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics. 2015 ; Vol. 5, No. 11. pp. 2267-2274.
@article{be4f9438561841fd9d3d8193bf033dfe,
title = "Convergent loss of awn in two cultivated rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima is caused by mutations in different loci",
abstract = "A long awn is one of the distinct morphological features of wild rice species. This organ is thought to aid in seed dispersal and prevent predation by animals. Most cultivated varieties of Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima, however, have lost the ability to form long awns. The causal genetic factors responsible for the loss of awn in these two rice species remain largely unknown. Here, we evaluated three sets of chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) in a common O. sativa genetic background (cv. Koshihikari) that harbor genomic fragments from Oryza nivara, Oryza rufipogon, and Oryza glaberrima donors. Phenotypic analyses of these libraries revealed the existence of three genes, Regulator of Awn Elongation 1 (RAE1), RAE2, and RAE3, involved in the loss of long awns in cultivated rice. Donor segments at two of these genes, RAE1 and RAE2, induced long awn formation in the CSSLs whereas an O. sativa segment at RAE3 induced long awn formation in O. glaberrima. These results suggest that the two cultivated rice species, O. sativa and O. glaberrima, have taken independent paths to become awnless.",
keywords = "African rice, Asian rice, Awn, CSSLs, Domestication",
author = "Tomoyuki Furuta and Norio Komeda and Kenji Asano and Kanako Uehara and Rico Gamuyao and Angeles-Shim, {Rosalyn B.} and Keisuke Nagai and Kazuyuki Doi and Wang, {Diane R.} and Hideshi Yasui and Atsushi Yoshimura and Jianzhong Wu and McCouch, {Susan R.} and Motoyuki Ashikari",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1534/g3.115.020834",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "2267--2274",
journal = "G3 (Bethesda, Md.)",
issn = "2160-1836",
publisher = "Genetics Society of America",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Convergent loss of awn in two cultivated rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima is caused by mutations in different loci

AU - Furuta, Tomoyuki

AU - Komeda, Norio

AU - Asano, Kenji

AU - Uehara, Kanako

AU - Gamuyao, Rico

AU - Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn B.

AU - Nagai, Keisuke

AU - Doi, Kazuyuki

AU - Wang, Diane R.

AU - Yasui, Hideshi

AU - Yoshimura, Atsushi

AU - Wu, Jianzhong

AU - McCouch, Susan R.

AU - Ashikari, Motoyuki

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - A long awn is one of the distinct morphological features of wild rice species. This organ is thought to aid in seed dispersal and prevent predation by animals. Most cultivated varieties of Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima, however, have lost the ability to form long awns. The causal genetic factors responsible for the loss of awn in these two rice species remain largely unknown. Here, we evaluated three sets of chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) in a common O. sativa genetic background (cv. Koshihikari) that harbor genomic fragments from Oryza nivara, Oryza rufipogon, and Oryza glaberrima donors. Phenotypic analyses of these libraries revealed the existence of three genes, Regulator of Awn Elongation 1 (RAE1), RAE2, and RAE3, involved in the loss of long awns in cultivated rice. Donor segments at two of these genes, RAE1 and RAE2, induced long awn formation in the CSSLs whereas an O. sativa segment at RAE3 induced long awn formation in O. glaberrima. These results suggest that the two cultivated rice species, O. sativa and O. glaberrima, have taken independent paths to become awnless.

AB - A long awn is one of the distinct morphological features of wild rice species. This organ is thought to aid in seed dispersal and prevent predation by animals. Most cultivated varieties of Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima, however, have lost the ability to form long awns. The causal genetic factors responsible for the loss of awn in these two rice species remain largely unknown. Here, we evaluated three sets of chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) in a common O. sativa genetic background (cv. Koshihikari) that harbor genomic fragments from Oryza nivara, Oryza rufipogon, and Oryza glaberrima donors. Phenotypic analyses of these libraries revealed the existence of three genes, Regulator of Awn Elongation 1 (RAE1), RAE2, and RAE3, involved in the loss of long awns in cultivated rice. Donor segments at two of these genes, RAE1 and RAE2, induced long awn formation in the CSSLs whereas an O. sativa segment at RAE3 induced long awn formation in O. glaberrima. These results suggest that the two cultivated rice species, O. sativa and O. glaberrima, have taken independent paths to become awnless.

KW - African rice

KW - Asian rice

KW - Awn

KW - CSSLs

KW - Domestication

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84947429912&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84947429912&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1534/g3.115.020834

DO - 10.1534/g3.115.020834

M3 - Article

C2 - 26338659

AN - SCOPUS:84947429912

VL - 5

SP - 2267

EP - 2274

JO - G3 (Bethesda, Md.)

JF - G3 (Bethesda, Md.)

SN - 2160-1836

IS - 11

ER -